2005 A pilot study of social cognition and interaction training SCIT for

2005 a pilot study of social cognition and

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(2005). A pilot study of social cognition and interaction training (SCIT) for schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research, 80 (2-3), 357-359. Pinkham, A., Hopfinger, J. B., Pelphrey, K. A., Piven, J., & Penn, D. L. (in press). Schizophrenia and high functioning autism share neural abnormalities when performing a complex social cognitive task. Schizophrenia Research . Roberts, D. L., Penn, D., & Combs, D. R. (2004). Social Cognition and Interacation Training: Treatment manual. Salem, J. E., Kring, A. M., & Kerr, S. L. (1996). More evidence for generalized poor performance in facial emotion perception in schizophrenia. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 105 (3), 480-483. Sasson, N., Tsuchiya, N., Hurley, R., Couture, S. M., Penn, D. L., Adolphs, R., et al. (2007). Orienting to social stimuli differentiates social cognitive impairment in autism and schizophrenia. Neuropsychologia, 45 (11), 2580-2588. Smith, T., Scahill, L., Dawson, G., Guthrie, D., Lord, C., Odom, S., et al. (2006). Designing Research Studies on Psychosocial Interventions in Autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37 (2), 354-66. Tager-Flusberg, H. (1999). A psychological approach to understanding the social and language impairments in autism. International Review of Psychiatry, 11 (4), 325- 334. Tantam, D. (1991). Asperger syndrome in adulthood. In U. Frith (Ed.), Autism and Asperger syndrome. (pp. 147-183): Cambridge University Press. Wechsler, D. (1999). Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) . San Antonio, TX: Harcourt Assessment.
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SCIT-A 18 Author Note Lauren M. Turner-Brown, Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Timothy Perry, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Gabriel S. Dichter, Department of Psychiatry and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and the Duke-UNC Brain Imaging and Analysis Center, Durham, NC, USA James W. Bodfish, Department of Psychiatry and Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA David L. Penn, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Acknowledgements. We are grateful to the adults who generously participated in this study and would like to acknowledge the valuable contribution of Tia Holtzclaw to the project. This research was supported in part by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (T32-HD40127and R01MH-73402), the Foundation of Hope (NC), and by North Carolina Division TEACCH. G. Dichter was supported by a career development award from UNC-Chapel Hill, NIH/NCRR K12 RR023248 (Orringer). Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to: Lauren M. Turner Brown, Ph.D. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research Center CB #3367 University of North Carolina
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SCIT-A 19 Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3367 919-966-0506 [email protected]
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SCIT-A 20 Table 1 Demographic characteristics of sample (n = 11) ________________________________________________________________ Treatment (n = 6) TAU Control (n = 5) ________________________________________________________________ Chronological age (yrs) Mean (s.d.) 42.5 (12.3) 28.8 (1.0) Range 25 – 55 27 - 29 IQ* Mean (s.d.) 113.3 (20.0) 110.6 (14.7) Range 84 – 144 87 - 124 Male (proportion) 5/6 5/5 Caucasian (proportion) 6/6 3/5 ________________________________________________________________ * Scores derived from the Wechsler Abbreviated Scales of Intelligence, Full Scale IQ - 2.
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