Course Hero Logo

It was my job to ask the weroance of each town we

Course Hero uses AI to attempt to automatically extract content from documents to surface to you and others so you can study better, e.g., in search results, to enrich docs, and more. This preview shows page 19 - 24 out of 148 pages.

It was my job to ask the weroance of each town we stopped in,
14“Where can we find silver and gold like this?”But the Indians didn’t know wheresuch metals could be found, only copper, which to the English was not so valuable.It was wonderful tosee John White painting thepeople of the town, theirdances, their crops.Thepeople crowded around to seethemselves in his paintings.In Pomeioc (2) White paintedChief Wingina himself, whowas visiting there at the time.Wingina was much pleasedwith the painting.On thatsame day, I watched as JohnWhite struggled to paint amother and her very fidgetychild.Even a doll couldn’tmake this child stand still, butJohn White managed tocreate a beautiful painting ofthem. John White himselfmade a wonderful impressionall the Algonquians, from thechiefs to the children, for hiskind and respectful mannertoward all.John White’s painting of an Algonquian mother and childGrenville, on the other hand made a sour face when the Indians could nottell him where there were gold and silver mines.And Grenville always made sureto make at least one soldier’s fire stick roar and belch fire.I think John Whiteinspired the affection of the Algonquians, while Grenville only inspired their fear.Although Wingina, weroance of the many towns, caught my eye several times,there was no opportunity then to sit with him and tell him what I had learned aboutthe English. I was certain the opportunity would come soon.
15Pomeioc village, painted by John WhiteJohn White painted the town of Pomeioc, which is typical of many towns inOssomocomuck.It is walled all around by sapling trees cut, sharpened, and stuckin the earth.Saplings were bent to form the frames of houses and buildings, andwoven mats covered the huts.The English were so surprised to see the towns.They had thought the Algonquians were like the wild beasts of the forest, sleepingwhere they happened to be.
16When we left Pomeiock, we sailed south and west along the mainland coastto the town of Aquascogoc (3), where again we spread our plates and cups of silverand gold to show the Indians and to ask, “Where can we find silver and gold likethis?”The Indians examined the plates and cups we set before them and talkedamong themselves, but they seemed not to understand what we wanted, though Idid my best to translate.There was more hospitality, but Grenville, feeling therewas nothing to be gained in Aquascogoc, decided to sail on.We continued to sailsouth and then west along a great peninsula on the mainland coast to the town ofSecota .After the Tyger ran aground, the English sail across the sound in small boatsto explore the mainland towns.1234GreatSalt Bay
17In Secota we were entertained lavishly, with feasts and dances, and the hourbeing late, at their invitation we stayed the night. On the next day the English tookthe opportunity to spread their wares, their gold plates and silver cups, and therewas much excited talk about silver mines far west up a great river in the land of theChawanooks.Grenville shot a look toward Lane, and a smile crept upon his lips.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 148 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Fall
Professor
N/A
Tags
Roanoke Colony, Roanoke Island, Wanchese, Grenville White

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture