The direct use of material from any source without

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accordingly. The direct use of material from any source without such acknowledgement constitutes plagiarism. The University of Toronto regards plagiarism as a serious academic offence. The University’s guidelines are attached - be sure to read and follow them. Plagiarism is easily spotted - avoid it! In marking the essay the tutors will consider four main aspects: (1) Quality of Research (3 marks) - Depth and intellectual rigour of the essay. (2) Originality and Conciseness (3 marks) - Incorporation of your own ideas, concise presentation, evidence of understanding of the topic, conviction of the arguments, appropriate use of quotes, quality of paraphrasing and discussion, logical flow. (3) English (2 marks) - Clarity, spelling, grammar, quality and flow of writing. We expect the grammar to be correct and the spelling standard. (4) Structure (2 marks) - Clear statement of theme, well-defined introduction, main body and conclusions. You may find some helpful information on writing at the University of Toronto’s Advice on Academic Writing website at .
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HOW NOT TO PLAGIARIZE From the Code of Behaviour on Academic Matters : It shall be an offence for a student knowingly: (d) to represent as one's own any idea or expression of an idea or work of another in any academic examination or term test or in connection with any other form of academic work, i.e. to commit plagiarism. Wherever in the Code an offence is described as depending on “knowing”, the offence shall likewise be deemed to have been committed if the person ought reasonably to have known. You've already heard the warnings about plagiarism. Obviously it's against the rules to buy essays or copy from your friends’ homework, and it's also plagiarism to borrow passages from books or articles or websites without identifying them. You know that the purpose of any paper is to show your own thinking, not create a patchwork of borrowed ideas. But you may still be wondering how you're supposed to give proper references to all the reading you've done and all the ideas you've encountered. The point of documenting sources in academic papers is not just to avoid unpleasant visits to the Dean's office, but to demonstrate that you know what is going on in your field of study. Get credit for having done your reading! Precise documentation is also a courtesy to your readers because it lets them look at the material you've found. That's especially important for Internet sources. The different systems for typing up references are admittedly a nuisance. See the handout “Standard Documentation Formats” for an overview. But the real challenge is establishing the relationship of your thinking to the reading you've done. Here are some common questions and basic answers. 1. Can't I avoid problems just by listing every source in the reference list?
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