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Specific heat capacity symbol c of a substance refers

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6specific heat capacity (symbol c) of a substance refers to what we might think of asits thermal inertia:Refer to the drawing below.The specific heat capacity of a substance is the amount of heat that must be addedor removed from a unit mass of the substance to change its temperature by 1. Ahigh specific heat capacity means a relatively small change in temperature for givenchange in internal energy content, just as a large inertial mass means a relativelysmall acceleration when a given force is applied.In the SI system the unit of c is the J/kg C, and in this system the specific heatcapacity of water is 4185 J/kg °C. Usually it is more convenient to use the kilojoule(kJ) in connection with heat, in which case c =4.19 kJ/kg.C. The actual values varysomewhat with temperature, and the ones given in the table below representaverages. Water has the highest specific heat of any common substance.When the kcal is being used as the heat unit, the corresponding unit of c is thekcal/kg °C. Thus the specific heat capacity of water is c = 1.00 kcal/kgC since 1kcal of heat is involved when 1 kg of water changes in temperature by 1C. In theBritish system, the unit of c is the Btu/lb.F. Because of the way the kcal and theBtu are defined, the numerical value of c for a substance is the same whether thekcal/kg..C or the Btu/lb.F is the unit; thus the specific heat capacity of water is1.00 Btu/lb.F.With the help of specific heat capacity, we can write a formula for the quantityof heat Q involved when a quantity m of a substance undergoes a change intemperature of ∆T. This formula is simplyQ = mc∆TQuantity of heatHeat transferred = (mass)(specific heat capacity )(temperature change)
The table shows the average specific heat capacities of various substances.Example 2:How much heat must be removed from 14 lb. of aluminum in order to cool itfrom 80F to 15F?Specific heat capacity(kcal/kg.C)Substance(kJ/kg.C)(Btu/lb.Air (1atm)0.700.17Alcohol (ethyl)2.430.58Aluminum0.920.22Ammonia4.290.25Brass0.380.0917Copper0.390.093Glass0.840.20Gold0.130.030Ice2.090.50Iron0.460.11Lead0.130.030Marble0.880.21Mercury0.140.33Platinum0.1330.0317Silver0.230.056Steam2.010.48Tin0.2280.0543Tungsten0.1350.0322Water4.191.00Wood (pine)1.760.42Zinc0.3860.0922F)
DR. DANILO F. RUBRICO7

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Term
Summer
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Thermodynamics, Energy, Heat, Heat Transfer, Dr Danilo F Rubrico

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