The narrator uses the exaggerated diction thirsting and metaphorically compares

The narrator uses the exaggerated diction thirsting

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slaveholders as you talk to savages in Africa.” The narrator uses the exaggerated diction “thirsting” and metaphorically compares water of life to the dire yearning to their rights as people. Furthermore Jacobs adds the point of self contradiction that shows arrogance of the U.S. or white supremacy as a whole. Denying these “thousands” of slaves their privileges, then accepting these wrong acts, yet going to aid others elsewhere from unjust doings stems her argument and displays her displeased attitude of double standard. Moving along she interprets the actual downfall of slavery itself. She states “Are doctors blind?.. He assures slavery is “patriarchal institution” .... What does he know of the young girls dragged down into
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moral filth?” The strong and forward diction of “moral filth” uses pathos to connect what slaves females encountered; the question beginning the quote clearly show the strong emotion of a gilded image that shields the negative truth of slavery. The display of fierceness of what her side of slavery was connects the part of discontent she feels. Her overall appeal was a distaste of what was deemed right or wrong in society at that time and the treatment of the paradoxical position of white males in society.
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