Without these three women the United States would have not have gone into space

Without these three women the united states would

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These very intelligent women are Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, and Katherine Johnson. Without these three women the United States would have not have gone into space. These three women encounter racial bias and segregation throughout Hidden Figures. These encounters are true stories that happened to them in their lifetime. For example, Kathrine Johnson is a brilliant mathematician is sent to reinsure her math abilities in front of the board of NASA. She does an amazing job, she solves multiple problems with their algorithm. Her fellow college, Mary Jackson is an aerospace engineer, is requested to assist with the building of the space capsule that will carry John Glenn into orbit. Jackson found out there was a problem with the space capsule and reported it to the head engineer. The head engineer then wants her to enter the engineering program at NASA. She runs into a conflict when she is told that in order for her to qualify she the program she needs more college credit. When she goes to enroll in the classes the school exclaims that they do not allow African American students to attend. Yet she goes in the classes anyways. The head of their program, Dorothy Vaughan, learns that her entire department will be replaced due to computers. Which means everyone will be laid off. She does not let this happen and she learns how to operate the computer and teaches everyone. One of the women was a mother of four and had a husband. Her name was Dorothy Vaughan, who was one of the first African American women to receive a job at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory as a “human computer”. Dorothy Vaughan was notorious for locking in promotions for her female colleagues. From 1949 until 1958 Dorothy Vaughan was head of the segregated West Area Computing section at National Advisory Committee for
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Aeronautics (NACA). Dorothy Vaughan was NASA's first African-American manager and an honored mathematician.
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