139 150 in Criminal Behavior Systems eds Marshal B Clinard and Richard Quinney

139 150 in criminal behavior systems eds marshal b

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139-150 in “Criminal Behavior Systems,” eds. Marshal B. Clinard and Richard Quinney. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston. Geis, Gilbert. 1974. “Avocational Crime.” Pp. 273-298 in “Handbook of Criminology,” ed.Daniel Glaser, Chicago: Rand McNally. Geis, Gilbert, and Colin Goff. 1983. “Introduc- tion” in “White Collar Crime: The Uncut Ver- sion,” ed. Edwin H. Sutherland, New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press. Geis, Gilbert, Robert F. Meier, and Lawrence S. Salinger, eds. 1995. “White-Collar Crime: Classic and Contemporary Views.” New York: Free Press. Geis, Gilbert. 1995. “A Review, Rebuttal, and Reconciliation of Cressey and Braithwaite and Fisse on Criminological Theory and Corporate Crime.” Pp. 399-428 in The Legacy of Anomie Theory,” Freda Adler and William S. Laufer, eds., New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction. Geis, Gilbert, and Ivan Bunn. 1997. “A Trial of Witches: A Seventeenth-Century Witchcraft Prosecution.” London: Routledge. Gottfredson, Michael, and Travis Hirschi. 1990. “A General Theory of Crime.” Stanford, Conn.: Stanford University Press. Hartung, Frank E. 1950. “White-Collar Offens- es in the Wholesale Meat Industry in Detroit.” American Journal of Sociology , 56: 25-35. Jesilow, Paul, Henry Pontell, and Gilbert Geis. 1993. “Prescription for Profi t: How Doctors Defraud Medicaid.” Berkeley: University of California Press. Lemert, Edwin M. 1972. “Human Deviance, Social Problems, and Social Control,” 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice-Hall. Sutherland, Edwin H. 1940. “White-Collar Criminality.” American Sociological Review , 5:1-12. Sutherland, Edwin H. 1949. “White Collar Crime.” New York: Dryden Sutherland, Edwin H. 1973. “On Analyzing Crime.” Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Tonry, Michael, and Albert J. Reiss, Jr., eds. 1993. “Beyond the Law: Crime in Complex Organizations.” Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Wilson, James Q., and Richard Hernnstein. 1985. “Crime and Human Nature.” “I have only one regret about my association with Gil: I didn’t meet him sooner.” — Dr. Joseph T. Wells, CFE, CPA
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Affinity is only skin deep INSIDIOUS FRAUD OF FAMILIARITY Fraudsters know no boundaries, even when it comes to their sup- posed friends and family. Affinity fraud is a particularly insidious crime in which fraudsters use their similar characteristics to others to gain trust ultimately exploiting that trust for their own financial gain. @ DIMUSE/iStockphoto
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FRAUD-MAGAZINE.COM MARCH/APRIL 2013 FRAUD MAGAZINE 43 C ambodian fraud victims said that fellow immigrant Seng Tan arrived at their homes in a black Mercedes S500 to out- line investment opportunities. With her Canadian-Cambodian citizen husband, James Bunchan, Tan impressed many of her uneducated fellow Cambodians with appearances of wealth and the way she dressed. Like them, Tan had fl ed the horrors of the Pol Pot regime. She knelt in their temple to pray, and they cried and laughed together over their shared experiences. The immigrant families, who didn’t have enough cash to invest, collected money from relatives, cashed out retirement accounts and took out equity loans on their homes. Fraud
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