Any sparkle or vivacity of life she experienced was with and through Sula and

Any sparkle or vivacity of life she experienced was

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order to have a respectable social position within the Bottom's black community.  Any sparkle or vivacity of life she experienced was with and through Sula, and  the novel ends with Nel weeping for all of the years she lost while thinking that  she was mourning her husband~Jude's absence when, in truth, she was  mourning for her lost, wonderful friend, Sula. sula’s sister After her husband dies, Hannah goes back to live with her mother, Eva. She soon starts having sex with the married men of the Bottom. One day, Hannah asks Eva if Eva ever loved her and her siblings. Eva snaps back that she fed and clothed them and made sure they didn't get sick. But Hannah wants to know why Eva never had fun with them or spent quality time with them. Although she asks the question, she seems fine with Eva's unwillingness to fully answer her. Soon after this conversation, Hannah has a dream about a red wedding dress. She tells Eva about the dream, then goes out to the backyard to start a fire. Somehow, Hannah catches on fire. Eva jumps out her bedroom window to try to save her daughter, to no avail. Hannah runs to her neighbors', who throw her in
water. She doesn't survive, and the fire leaves her burned beyond recognition. Hannah makes an early departure from the novel, but her influence on Sula remains constant and profound. By sleeping with her friends' husbands, Hannah teaches Sula to regard sex as "pleasant and frequent, but otherwise unremarkable" (1921.40). Hannah "ripple[s] with sex" (1921.39). She seems quite happy without a husband, and she doesn't seem particularly concerned with being a good mother to Sula. (She tells her friends that she loves her daughter but doesn't like her.) It's not clear what we should make of Hannah. Should we dislike her for sleeping around, and for neglecting Sula? What does she tell us about marriage and propriety, happy as she is without either? Hannah's death further complicates these questions. Sula watches her mother die in a fire, but we never hear of any grief on Sula's part. Is Hannah being punished? Or is the fire somehow redemptive? We never get the answers to these questions. Many of Hannah's qualities emerge in Sula as an adult. Perhaps this is a commentary on the legacy that mothers pass onto their daughters.
Morrison, Toni. Sula . New York: Knopf; 1974. Print. Clay, Andrea. Wang, Bella ed. "Sula 1922 Summary and Analysis". GradeSaver, 25 February 2011 Web. 23 November 2015.
Clay, Andrea. Wang, Bella ed. "Sula 1922 Summary and Analysis". GradeSaver, 25 February 2011 Web. 23 November 2015.

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