ch17

Psychology in Action

  • No School
  • NONE 0
  • Notes
  • 29
  • 100% (2) 2 out of 2 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 26 - 29 out of 29 pages.

beginning of class, divide students into pairs and let each pair decide who is Partner A or Partner B. Pass around the half-sheets to the appropriate partners, while reminding each to keep his/her sheet private. Allow partners to interact for approximately 5 to 10 minutes. Before you discuss the different instructions given to each partner, ask Partner A’s how they felt during the interaction, and write their comments on one-half of the blackboard. On the other half of the blackboard, add Partner B’s responses to the same question. Use differences between the lists to discuss gender and cultural differences and common problems in communication. If the class is very large, the exercise could be modified to include a group of observers who would simply watch the exchange of partners A and B. These observers should take notes to help remember what happened.
Image of page 26

Subscribe to view the full document.

H andout 17.1 - Gender and Cultural Diversity Partner A and Partner B Communication --------------------------------------------------CUT HERE------------------------------------------------------- PARTNER A Important instructions: 1. Make your partner feel "at home." Achieve eye contact, smile, nod and stay physically close to your partner. (You may touch him/her if he/she seems to feel comfortable with it.) 2. Create an atmosphere of warmth and trust. You may need to talk about yourself as a way of encouraging your partner to open up about himself/herself. Be friendly. Get to know your partner. 3. Your goal is to find out as much as you can about your partner. What are his/her interests, abilities, talents, problems? What about his/her family, etc.? FIND OUT ALL YOU CAN. --------------------------------------------------(CUT HERE)----------------------------------------------------- PARTNER B Important instructions: 1. Your partner is an authority figure. Be SURE that your behavior towards your partner is respectful. Do NOT insult your partner, or act as if you are friends or equals. 2. In your culture, the way to act respectful is to: a. Answer questions politely. b. Avoid eye contact. (It is rude to look directly into an authority figure's eyes. Look down! c. Maintain an appropriate distance. Be sure not to move in too close to him/her. d. If you are insulted, don't get angry. e. Avoid asking "nosy" personal questions. 3. Your goal is to show respect to the authority figure, and to get through this interview without acting insulted. It is very important to KEEP YOUR PRIVATE AFFAIRS TO YOURSELF! (Private information may be used against you in the future.)
Image of page 27
W riting P roject Writing Project 17.1 Given the need for improved writing skills in college students, and to respond to the call for "writing across the curriculum," we offer writing projects for each chapter. In Chapter 17, we suggest a 2-3 page written response to one of the issues found on Handout 17.1 - Writing Project. Recognizing the time involved in grading such writing projects, one alternative is occasionally to assign "peer grading." Collect their papers, remove student names, and give one paper to each student to grade. It helps to make their participation in peer grading part of the overall points for the writing project. This encourages a more thoughtful and responsible evaluation, as well as acknowledging and rewarding the additional work.
Image of page 28

Subscribe to view the full document.

H andout 17.1 – Writing Project
Image of page 29
You've reached the end of this preview.
  • '
  • NoProfessor
  • The Land, Occupational health psychology

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern