78 rubbing of stone relief the archer yi wu family

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[78] Rubbing of stone relief (The Archer Yi). Wu Family Shrines, Shandong. Eastern Han dynasty, 147-151 CE This is the Archer Yi, a rubbing of stone relief found in the Wu Family Shrines of the Han dynasty. This piece was produced by the rubbing of a fabric on a low stone relief, which produce stamp-like images of the relief forms onto to fabric. The forms lack detail and appear to be dark blobs or silhouettes in the outlines of human beings, as the only sign of differentiation between these figures are the profile shown by the shape contrast between the black figures against the white background. Indicated by the horizontal composition and absence of three-quarter views, the piece lacks a sense of dimension and space, which is demonstrated by the deliberate “stacking” of the figures bowing before the central figure in the palace scene. The composition is horizontally divided into three parts. The lower section depict a procession of chariots and footmen (army) marching to the left of the piece. The middle part is dominated by a scene of political homage inside a pavilion or palace, suggesting that the scene of the court is a value of high society. It is important to note that the figures underneath the roof of this establishment are oriented towards this middle figure that is proportionally bigger than the others. Immediately to the left of this scene is a stylized tree with repeated and individualized leaf forms as decorative designs. With the replicated silhouettes of the leaves and figures, this piece is portrayed by an official or formal style. This particular style also conveys the static movement of the forms, as suggested by the bowing position of the two figures in the palace. The archer Yi appears to the far left. The upper portion contains influential Chinese thinkers, such as Confucius and Laozi (Daoism). [83] Rubbing of earthenware tile with scenes of hunting and harvesting. Sichuan. Han dynasty. These Scenes of hunting and harvesting were produced by the rubbing of earthenware tiles, a technique of the Han dynasty. The rubbing of stone relief ultimately produces figures that
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lack detail and appear to be silhouette outlines of human forms. The piece is horizontally divided into two halves: the upper half depicts hunting, whereas the lower half illustrates harvesting and gathering. The land and orientation of the hunters with respects to each other suggests an imaginary diagonal line, indicating that the piece has some degree of spatial and dimensional understanding. The proportions of the size of the birds and fishes seem to be naturally handled but are ultimately portrayed in formal styles due to the replication and irregular representation of these animals. In the lower half, the human figures are also formally represented due to the lack of detail and similar representation. The actions of the two right figures imply dynamic motion as they swing their farming instruments to harvest the rice field. Accompanied by the orientation of the rice plants, the spatial orientation of the gatherers in the middle of the section suggests a sense of dimension due to their diagonal positioning. Stylistically, the piece is formal due to the exaggerated proportion of the fish,
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