Native american girls from apache communities in the

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, girls are allowed to get married.Native American:Girls from Apache communities in the United States go through a Sunrise Ceremony (Na ii ees) to celebrate their puberty. The ceremony is a re-enactment of the myth of the first Apache woman. Before the ceremony, girls build themselves a special hut where they stay during and after the ritual. The event involves many community members, as well as singing, dancing and ceremonial makeup. Meet Melanieand Tarawho both have had their Sunrise Ceremonies.Latin America:A girl’s 15th birthday is a cause for celebration in many Latin American communities because that’s the day she becomes an adult. On the outside a Quinceanerais just an extra big party, but there are many traditions that have deeper meaning: the birthday girl recognizes the people that have been important during her first fifteen years, dances a special waltz, and leaves behind symbols of her childhood like toys and shoes.
What symbolizes the transition from girlhood to womanhood for you and your community?The Akan/kæn/əˈare a meta-ethnicitypredominantly speaking Central Tano languagesand residing in the southern regions of the former Gold Coast regionin what is today the nation of Ghana. Akans also make-up the majority of the populace in the Ivory Coast.Akans are the largest group in both countries and have a population of roughly 20 million people.The Akan language(also known as Twi–Fante) is a group of dialects within the Central Tano branch of the Potou–Tano subfamilyof the Niger–Congo family.[2]++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++Hipple, Annika. S. (2008). Prudence International Magazine. Coming-of-age Rituals in Africa: Tradition & Change. In Nigeria, young girls known as iriabo spend several weeks in “fattening rooms” being pampered and wearing copper coils around their legs to restrict movement as part of a ritual marking their official transition into womanhood. In Senegal, Bassari boys undergoing the Korérite are taken into a sacred forest where they experience a symbolic death and a simulated return to infancy, a state of ritual purity from which they are reborn as mature members of the community.These are just two examples of the elaborate coming-of-age rituals with which traditional societies throughout Africa have marked the passage from childhood to adulthood. In parts of thecontinent, these traditions remain strong, while in others, changing social, economic and politicalconditions have had a profound influence on the extent to which these ceremonies are performed and the forms the rituals take.Unlike in many Western societies, where the boundary between childhood and adulthood is oftenblurred, traditional African rites of passage mark an unambiguous transition with an associated change of status, roles and responsibilities.

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