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Resolution atlas figure 4 5 page 33 magnification in

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400X or 1000X, depending on the Objective Lens you use. Resolution (Atlas Figure 4-5, Page 33) Magnification in and of itself is Useless. Sleezoid Toy Microscopes can legitimately advertise Magnifications of 1200X. The more Important Term is Resolution, which is the Ability of an Optical Device to reveal Detail (technically, the Ability to perceive two closely-spaced Lines as separate Lines). Think in Terms of Megapixels. All other Factors being equal, the greater the Number of Megapixels, the greater the Resolution of a Digital Camera. More Detail. The Resolution of your Microscope is 0.25 μ m, which is just short of the Theoretical Limit imposed by the Laws of Optics (0.20 μ m) . These are seriously Good Microscopes. Resolution can be improved a bit by decreasing the Wavelength of the Light Source but this Approach is limited. Microscopes designed to utilize Ultraviolet Light were designed in the 1930s and 1940s, but these Microscopes used very expensive Quartz Lenses. Some older Microscopes used a Green Filter that limited the Light to a single Wavelength (Green), which also happens to be the Color to which the Human Eye is most Sensitive (someone needs to tell this to Audi and BMW). Oil Immersion Resolution can be improved by using Immersion Oil, which has the same Refractive Index as Glass. Think of the Immersion Oil as the optical Equivalent of putting your Ear against a Wall so you can hear what’s going on in the Room next Door. Your 100X Lens -- and only your 100X Lens -- is an Oil Immersion Objective. ____________________________ She can’t do that! Shoot her or something! © 2002 LucasFilm Ltd.
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Lab 3 Page 21 The Gram Stain (Atlas Pages 45-48) To do a Gram Stain, you’ll first need to make Smears of Bacteria and Heat Fix these Smears. Heat Fixing does 3 Things: 1- It fixes Morphology Ever tried dissecting a raw Egg? It ʼ s a mess. But if you boil the Egg first, you ʼ ll “fix” its internal Morphology and be able to fairly easily see the Relationship between the Yolk and White and Air Pocket. Likewise, Heat Fixing “fixes” the Morphology of your Bacteria. 2- It sticks the Bacteria to the Slide Ever tried frying an Egg in a Non-Stick Pan without any Butter? The Egg will adhere to the Pan and be next to impossible to remove. Likewise, Heat Fixing adheres the Bacteria to the Slide. 3- It kills the Bacteria. Ever eaten a raw Egg? Well, you could but you shouldn ʼ t. Cooking kills Bacteria. Likewise, Heat Fixing kills Bacteria. As you undoubtedly remember from Lecture, Gram Positive Bacteria have a very thick Peptidoglycan Layer outside of their Cell Membranes. Gram Negative Bacteria have a very, very thin Peptidoglycan Layer outside of their Cell Membrane, plus an Outer Membrane outside of their Peptidoglycan Layer. The Gram Stain allows us to distinguish Gram Positive Bacteria from Gram Negative Bacteria using just a few Stains and a Microscope.
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