Another customer finds it and shares your innermost

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Another customer finds it and shares your innermost secrets on his blog, but never identifies you as being the writer of the journal.At a family reunion at your parents’ home, you see Dave, a second cousin, place a very expensive bottle of wine in a duffle bag and quickly walk out of the backdoor. You quickly go to your father and tell him that Dave stole wine from the family wine cellar and your father calls the police. In reality, your mother told Dave to pick any bottle of wine as a belated birthday present.ANSWER:All of these scenarios have a shade of gray. In each case an argument for an intentional tort can be made, but the question is can they be proved in court? Let’s look at the poor sap who leaves their personal journal at the coffee shop. The customer that finds it has a civil and moral obligation to turn it in. Instead they decide to use theses private thoughts as their own. The intentional tort is fraud. This customer is taking someone’s private thoughts and life experiences, passes them off as their own. From the victim’s perspective it would be devastating to find your private thoughts posted in someone’s blog. To the average person reading, you would have no way of identifying who the person is or what they are talking about as long as names are never posted with it. I'm sure in their head they feel like everyone reading would know. The person posting the comment could be sued for fraud, this is where the burden of proof lies with the accusers. How
will you be able to identify the that the notebook is yours?! What if the customer, says it didn't exist?

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