Prosecutors have absolute immunity when acting as

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Wrightsman's Psychology and the Legal System
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Chapter 13 / Exercise 5
Wrightsman's Psychology and the Legal System
Greene/Heilbrun
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Prosecutors have absolute immunity when acting as advocates for the state in criminal prosecutions. 4. They have limited liability when acting as administrators or investigators. J. Hurdles to suing officers and the government 1. People who sue the government or its officers rarely win. 2. Reasons for failure include: a) It’s expensive. b) It takes a long time. c) Juries are more likely to believe police officers than plaintiffs. d) Officials have absolute, qualified, and/or official immunity. e) Officers have no affirmative duty to protect. f) Some cases are frivolous. IV. Administrative Remedies A. There are two types of administrative remedies: internal review and external civilian review. B. Internal review is by internal affairs units (IAU) made up of department officers. 1. Internal review has four stages: a) Intake – Intake officers accept complaints. b) Investigation – Other officers gather evidence and interview witnesses. c) Deliberation – Other officers weigh evidence. d) Disposition – Making a decision involves three stages. (1) First stage – The deliberating officers decide among four dispositions: (a) Unfounded – The act didn’t take place. (b) Exonerated – The act took place but was justified, lawful, and proper. (c) Not sustained – There’s not enough evidence to prove the allegations in the complaint. (d) Sustained – The evidence proved the allegations. (2) Next stage – The officers recommend disciplinary action for sustained complaints. (a) Oral reprimand (b) Written reprimand
We have textbook solutions for you!
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Wrightsman's Psychology and the Legal System
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 13 / Exercise 5
Wrightsman's Psychology and the Legal System
Greene/Heilbrun
Expert Verified
(c) Transfer (d) Retraining (e) Counseling (f) Suspension (g) Demotion (h) Fine (i) Dismissal (3) Final stage – The recommendations are forwarded and moved up the chain of command to the chief for final disposition. 2. Internal review has its critics. a) Police can’t police themselves. b) Some parts of the public don’t accept the legitimacy of self supervision. C. External review was set up to overcome criticism of internal review: “Who will watch the watchman?” 1. Civilians outside the department review (or participate in reviewing) complaints. 2. Police don’t like civilian review. a) It interferes with police independence. b) Outsiders don’t understand police work. c) It pierces the “blue curtain” that hides “real” police work from view. 3. The point in reviews when civilians (nonofficers) participate varies. a) Collect facts b) Review investigation report c) Recommend disciplinary action to chief d) Review chief’s disposition 4. Civil service laws require that only chiefs have the legal authority to order disciplinary action.

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