22 i promised myself i would never lie again that is

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Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 56
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
Johnson/Mowry
Expert Verified
22. “I promised myself I would never lie again. That is why I have to tell this drunk angry man that the child who just escaped his basement is hiding behind the bush in my yard.” a. burden of proof b. fallacy of accident Practice Problems 7.3 (continued)
(continued) © 2015 Bridgepoint Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Not for resale or redistribution.
We have textbook solutions for you!
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Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 1 / Exercise 56
Mathematics: A Practical Odyssey
Johnson/Mowry
Expert Verified
Summary and Resources c. red herring d. appeal to tradition e. no fallacy 23. Doctor: “It is ethically acceptable to test newly developed medications on homeless people who need money.” Nurse: “But doesn’t that exploit these people based on their need?” Doctor: “Prove to me that it is not acceptable.” Practice Problems 7.3 (continued)
Summary and Resources Chapter Summary There are many fallacies beyond those covered in this chapter. However, learning this sam- ple of important and common logical fallacies will help sharpen one’s critical thinking skills so that one is less likely to become the victim (knowingly or otherwise) of logical tricks. However, when learning about fallacies it is also important to stay positive and to use the knowledge for good: to promote high-quality reasoning delivered in a sincere and respectful manner (for some ideas on how to stay positive, see Everyday Logic: Staying Positive in the Face of Fallacies ). © 2015 Bridgepoint Education, Inc. All rights reserved. Not for resale or redistribution.
24. “What? You believe that peace is actually possible in the Middle East? Ha! That’s the craziest thing I have ever heard.”
25. “It’s not acceptable to harm another person. Since jail harms the freedoms of a per- son, we should release serial killers and rapists.”
Summary and Resources It is a mark of a mature thinker to consider multiple points of view and come to conclusions only after thorough consideration of the best evidence and best reasoning available. We should never fall for these types of traps (often set by a lack of effort in carefully thinking through the evidence). Learning the fallacies helps one think critically and avoid erroneous reasoning—and can help us avoid falling for fallacies in the future. Everyday Logic: Staying Positive in the Face of Fallacies Learning about the fallacies should come with a warning: Once you learn to identify the falla- cies, you may start to notice them everywhere. People commit them on TV, in newspapers, in books, and in face-to-face conversations all the time. Noticing the prevalence of these fallacies can be fascinating and eye-opening; however, it can also be dangerous. One of the risks of notic- ing fallacies is cynicism, in which one becomes overly skeptical of anything and everything.

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