In your work life you will encounter customers and colleagues of different ages

In your work life you will encounter customers and

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In your work life, you will encounter customers and colleagues of different ages, races, religions and levels of expertise or ability, among many other things. You will communicate with people in writing and verbally in many different situations. The communication techniques listed below assist customer service staff to communicate effectively. The same techniques assist staff with responsibilities for promotional activities to actively participate in verbal exchanges and clarify, explain and present information relating to promotional activity. Speaking clearly Speak clearly and use appropriate vocabulary and an effective pitch and intonation. This is how you use your voice to show extra information, such as whether you are asking a question, whether you are surprised or sympathetic, what your attitude is, e.g. a respectful attitude or an arrogant attitude. Listening and questioning When you are being given a lot of information verbally, you need to listen actively and may need to ask clarifying questions or read back a summary of the details you have noted, to clarify that all details are correct. An example of a clarifying question is ‘Have I got it right?’ Open and closed questions Asking someone an open question gives that person an opportunity to give you information that they regard as important. An example of an open question is ‘What do you think about that?’ A closed question is asked when you want to know if something happened or didn’t happen, is true or isn’t true and so on. An example of this is ‘Can you finish this by Friday?’ These may require only a one-word answer; for example: ‘What time can we catch up on Friday?’ Further tips Limit background noise and other distractions and barriers to communication. Use nods, smiles and other nonverbal indicators to show you are listening and understand.
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© Aspire Training & Consulting 53 Topic 2 Coordinate promotional activities Your social circle Real-life example Margaret called Stacey, a PR consultant and a friend of a friend, to help write a press release for a new product launch. Media networks Real-life example Lou, a media manager for a big IT company, uses an internet-based media board to post notices about recent developments in his corporation. Customer group Real-life example An insurance company has set up state-based groups where brokers who sell its insurance products meet twice monthly to swap information, catch up on new products and listen to professional development seminars. Word-of-mouth marketing as a promotional tool Word-of-mouth marketing is one of the most powerful promotional tools an organisation can have. All customers have networks. Some customers have wide, powerful networks of friends and colleagues who will recommend your organisation’s products and services. Even though each recommendation may only be influencing one person at a time, many people can be influenced by just one satisfied customer – another reason to keep customers happy through good-quality products and great customer service.
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  • Two '18
  • Henry Ford
  • Marketing

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