As you work on your writing assignments you will benefit the most if you plan

As you work on your writing assignments you will

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As you work on your writing assignments, you will benefit the most if you plan multiple visits to the Writing Center – for brainstorming and planning, for developing and organizing, and then for revising. Students are now able to schedule appointments online. They can do this via UCMe , or they can also click "Advising Appointments" in the VCU portal . English Language Resources @ the Writing Center Academic Learning Commons, 4 th Floor, Room 4203 828-4851 English Language Resources @ the Writing Center provides specialized support to English Language Learners at VCU. This service encourages success by helping students develop their vocabulary and reading comprehension, fluency in composition, oral communication, and understanding of American academic rhetorical expectations. Stop by the Writing Center or call to ask for an ELR consultation ! Overview of the Course Schedule (subject to change) Unit I (weeks 1-5) Experience/Culture/Text: Unit I engages students in integrating to the university and the community and exploring the theme of true stories through discussion, personal reflection, observation, active/critical reading, and formal and informal writing. The first part of this unit focuses on reflective and critical thinking, so that you are given the opportunity to reflect on your new goals and challenges as university students as well as your personal evolution as a person/student/citizen. Readings will be used to foster points of discussion. You will practice critical reading and writing strategies. The second part of this unit focuses on our theme through critical reading, reflective writing, and analysis. Inquiry Questions: What does it mean to be a community of learners? What is active listening? What is the value of reflection? What does it mean to think critically? What does it mean to read
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critically? How can we discern the unstated assumptions rooted beneath any author’s/speaker’s claim or line of reasoning? How can one use one’s careful observations, interviews, and/or survey methods as evidence to support larger claims? Core Assignments: Writing: A reflective and/or experiential narrative that may incorporate observational evidence (3 pages or 750-1000 words). Collaborative/Individual Presentation: (at Instructor’s discretion) Unit II (weeks 6-10) Text/Context : Unit II engages students in conversing with texts in order to recognize the limits of individual knowledge/experience and the value of others’ knowledge/experience. Students will demonstrate critical reading skills (e.g. annotate texts, summarize ideas, classify information as relevant or irrelevant, organize information, and prioritize information etc.); generate relevant questions (including those about numerical or statistical data); consider multiple perspectives; identify and analyze arguments; identify and critique assumptions; evaluate evidence; assess their own values, recognize ethical issues and identify the contexts of ethical problems; and acknowledge alternate viewpoints and/or values.
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