The store is never required to provide more than two accessible check out

The store is never required to provide more than two

This preview shows page 36 - 38 out of 45 pages.

The store is never required to provide more than two accessible check-out aisles, even if it would be readily achievable to do so.ILLUSTRATION 3: An office building that houses places of public accommodation is removing barriers in common areas. If the building were newly constructed, the building would be required to contain areas of rescue assistance. However, the ADAAG alterations standard explicitly specifies that areas of rescue assistance are not required in buildings that are being altered. Because barrier removal is not required to exceed the alterations standard, the building owner need not establish areas of rescue assistance.III-4.4500 Priorities for barrier removal. The Department's regulation recommends priorities for removing barriers in existing facilities. Because theresources available for barrier removal may not be adequate to remove all existing barriers at any given time, the regulation suggests a way to determinewhich barriers should be mitigated or eliminated first. The purpose of these priorities is to facilitate long-term business planning and to maximize the degree of effective access that will result from any given level of expenditure.These priorities are not mandatory. Public accommodations are free to exercise discretion in determining the most effective "mix" of barrier removalmeasures to undertake in their facilities.The regulation suggests that a public accommodation's first priority should beto enable individuals with disabilities to physically enter its facility. This priority on "getting through the door" recognizes that providing physical access to a facility from public sidewalks, public transportation, or parking is generally preferable to any alternative arrangements in terms of both businessefficiency and the dignity of individuals with disabilities.The next priority is for measures that provide access to those areas of a place of public accommodation where goods and services are made available to the public. For example, in a hardware store, to the extent that it is readily achievable to do so, individuals with disabilities should be given access not only to assistance at the front desk, but also access, like that available to othercustomers, to the retail display areas of the store.The third priority should be providing access to restrooms, if restrooms are provided for use by customers or clients.The fourth priority is to remove any remaining barriers to using the public accommodation's facility by, for example, lowering telephones.
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  • Spring '14
  • AmandaSisselman
  • Roe v. Wade, Supreme Court of the United States, United States Supreme Court, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Civil Rights Act of 1964

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