This stark comparison between dwellings and ultimately lifestyles helps shape

This stark comparison between dwellings and

This preview shows page 64 - 65 out of 153 pages.

ultimately lifestyles, helps shape the way Nick Carraway participates in the story, and also how he narrates it. First Person Point of ViewThe Great Gatsbyis narrated by Nick Carraway, but the way he tells the story changes throughout the book. Many of Carraway's insights are described through the first person point of view, where he references himself as he expresses his thoughts, feelings, actions,and observations: 'I lived at West Egg, the--well, the less fashionable of the two…' Throughout the story, Nick explains what he's doing and what he's saying, and occasionally offers us a little nugget of insight about what he thinks of Gatsby or the other people around him. For instance, in chapter six, he makes the following observationabout Gatsby: 'He talked a lot about the past, and I gathered that he wanted to recover something, some idea of himself perhaps, that had gone into loving Daisy.' Peripheral NarrationThe entire story, although told from Carraway's point of view, is really not about his own life. Instead, he describes his many encounters with Jay Gatsby, and at one point even shares Gatsby's origin story--something that Carraway never actually witnessed or experienced. For this reason, Carraway can be considered a peripheral narrator, or a narrator who's a part of the story, but is more of a bystander than an actor. Compared to the over-the-top lifestyle and personality of Gatsby, Carraway is somewhat banal: he's physically present throughout the book, but he goes relatively unnoticed. He participates in major events in the story by going to parties or having illuminating conversations with characters who know, or think they know, Gatsby. Despite that fact, Carraway is still more of an observer than a participant. His existence as a character is not the main point of the book, even though he's the one sharing the story with the reader.Lesson SummaryThe Great Gatsbyis told from the point of viewof Nick Carraway, a Midwestern transplant living in West Egg of the Long Island Sound. Carraway is the next door neighbor of Jay Gatsby, the book's central character. Carraway narrates the story from the first person point of view; the actions and events are seen and explained through his eyes. As a peripheral narrator, Carraway describes many events and actions, especially Gatsby's early life, that he was not actually there to see. Carraway is a part of the story, but acts as more of an observer or bystander than a participant. Overall, Carraway's character is relatively banal; he's physically present throughout the story, but he goes relatively unnoticed by the people around him. This allows him to observe and share the intimate details of Jay Gatsby's life, which is the central focus of the story.
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