Write sg and pl many things about the glory of our

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Chapter 3 / Exercise 2
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10.Write (sg. and pl.) many things about the glory of our state.
11.Does reason always lead your (pl.) queen to virtue?
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Chapter 3 / Exercise 2
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ALWAYS lead...?” Agit could be employed instead of ducit.)12.We shall always see many Greek names there.Multa n˙mina Graeca ibi semper vidbimus.SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE1.Frater meus vitam in otio semper aget.My brother will always lead his life in peace.(Again, students may be tempted to view agetas pres.rather than fut.)2.Age, age! Iuva me! Duc me ad secundum filium meum.Come, come! Help me! Lead me to my second son.(Ageis rather like our imper., “Get moving!” Askstudents if they can tell you the other three irreg. sg. imperatives: dic, fac, fer,p. 51.)3.O amici, libertatem perdimus.Friends, we are destroying our freedom.(Lat. tends to include the interj. Omore often than we use“O”/”Oh” in Eng., so the word may be omitted in translation.)4.Nova pericula populo Romano exponam sine mora.I will explain the new dangers to the Roman people without delay. (Ask students why sine morais delayedto the end of the sent.)5.Numquam periculum sine periculo vincemus.Never shall we overcome risk without risk.(Watch the vb. tense: pres. not fut.)6.Ex meis erroribus hominibus rectum iter demonstrare possum.From my (own) mistakes I am able to (can) show men the right way (course).(You could mention that “own”is a word we often use in Eng. with possessive adjs. like “my,” “your,” “his,” etc., whenreferring back to the subj. of the clause–but avoid any detailed discussion of reflexives, whichare formally introduced in Ch. 13--no need to overload them with too much additionalgrammar at this point).7.Catullus Marco Tullio Ciceroni magnas gratias agit.Catullus gives great thanks to Marcus Tullius Cicero.(Remind students always to translate names intothe nominative form: some may want to call the consul “Marco Ciceroni,” which sounds likesome exotic Italian pasta dish!)8.Eximia forma virginis oculos hominum convertit.The maiden’s extraordinary beauty attracts the eyes of men (men’s attention).9.Agamemnon magnas copias e terra Graeca ad Troiam ducet, ubi multos viros necabit.Agamemnon will lead his vast forces from the Greek land to Troy, where he will slay many men.(Be sure tocomment on the death mask in the photo on p. 53; though sometimes called the “mask ofAgamemnon,” it antedates the traditional date of the Trojan war by three centuries and thedate of the Iliadby as much as eight centuries. A few brief comments on the Trojan sagawould be in order, especially if your students are using Anne Groton and James May’s Thirty-Eight Latin Stories,Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, as a companion to Wheelock: the livelyGroton and May reading for Ch. 8 tells the story of Laocoön and the Trojan Horse.)10.

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