The Indian Residential School System abuse affected not only the individuals

The indian residential school system abuse affected

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 6 pages.

The Indian Residential School System abuse affected not only the individuals who attended these institutions, but also their children and their descendants through disturbing the intergenerational transfer of parenting skills. Without these essential skills, many survivors have had difficulties when raising their own children. The environment were children brought into was not a nurturing environment. Therefore, when it was their turn to have children, the abused individuals did not know how to take care of their children. All they knew was mistreatment. This idea follows Bandura’s social learning theory; family violence is cyclical as individuals learn from observing and imitating people around them, such as violent family members. Therefore, these individuals may tend to model and reproduce the violent behaviour of their family members on other people surrounding them. Bandura’s theory explains why Aboriginal people who have survived the IRSS reproduced, in their families, the violent and abusive relationships they learned while they were in the residential schools. The legacy of children removal from their families and communities, still impacts the mothers and their communities. The process of early detachment of the children from his mother, or other adult, will directly harm the child’s intellectual development and all of the benefits of attachment. Children traumatised by early separations
from their parents will then display low self-esteem, a general distrust of others, mood disorders (including depression and anxiety), socio-moral immaturity, and inadequate social skills. People who survived the residential schools continue to struggle with their identity since they have been taught to hate themselves and their culture. All the abuse described previously not only affected the individuals, but also had strong consequences on the Aboriginal faith, culture, families and communities of the children who were part of the Indian Residential Schooling System. Historically, the Canadian First Nations satisfied their material and spiritual needs through the natural resources surrounding them. However, the school authorities would force children to abandon their traditional languages, religion, clothing and lifestyle to impose the Catholic, United, Anglican or Presbyterian traditions and faith. The nuns, priests and social workers involved in Residential School System attempted to articulate, negotiate, and enforce certain valued constructions of gender, class, and race, sexuality, and spirituality within a group of children. The system caused a strong devastation from land base, culture, families and Aboriginal language. Although the Indian Residential School System was finally put to an end, the Aboriginal individuals the repercussions are still present. The Aboriginal people continued to believe that they belonged to a culture different from the one imposed on them by the residential schools, an Aboriginal culture, but were ashamed of it. Moreover, negative effects of the Indian Residential Schooling System are

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture