2 Next please rhetorically analyze Andrew Jacksons speeches inaugural and

2 next please rhetorically analyze andrew jacksons

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2. Next, please rhetorically analyze Andrew Jackson’s speeches (inaugural and second annual message.) How would you analyze the overall language/tone Jackson uses in his speeches? How does his language/tone change with each speech? Who is his intended audience in each speech, and what are his goals regarding dealings with American Indian tribes? 3. What kind of patterns or trajectory do you notice in Jackson's two speeches? 4. After, please rhetorically analyze Andrew Jackson's" Letter to the Cherokee". What about the tone, intended audience, and purpose in the letter? What were some key quotes/parts that stood out to you, and why? 5. Lastly, what aspects of the chapter "Jackson's White Republic" stood out to you? What, in your opinion, was a key passage or quote, and why? What are your overall thoughts/reactions to this week’s materials?
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The Indian Removal plans and policies emerged from the Louisiana Purchase. The Indigenous Nations weren’t consulted, and that land was home of the Sioux, Cheyenne, Arapaho, Crow, Pawnee, Osage, and Comanche. What followed was Jefferson’s “Indian Policy” and “Civilization program” that would try to drive the Indian people into debt with the United States so they would have to sell their land. Quickly it progressed into calling for removal and Jackson was at the root of it. In Andrew Jackson’s first inaugural speech I believe he has an optimistic and persuasive tone in order to assure the American population that what he is doing is good and for the people. In this speech he claims he wants friendly foreign affairs, he assures the general population that he wants peace and not to enlarge the military. His language and tone shifts in his second Annual Message to condescending and mocking of the Indigenous people. He calls them “savage hunters” and hopes that their decay will result in “[casting] off their savage habits and become an interesting, civilized, and Christian community.” I believe his intended audience in the second speech is for the expanding population, he is encouraging them to take their new home. I notice a pattern of white racism and manifest destiny in his speeches. He also hides the terror of the genocide in the ‘story’ of a birth of a nation. This tone he develops in these two speeches will soon be the overall narrative of the story that is developed by presidents and historians later on. In Andrew Jackson’s letter to the Cherokee’s has a pathetic and sensationalistic tone. His audience was to the resistance and all indigenous people. His goal was to convince the indigenous people to submit and conform to US society and be “civilized.” It stood out to me that Andrew Jackson kept referring to the Cherokees as “friends”, when he slaughtered them at every chance he got. He also kept mentioning that the they only have one solution, and that was to abide by the US and to take his ‘advice’. It shocked me how much US leaders set the Indigenous people up to end up in debt to the US government, it was well thought out in every small move. The US truly wanted pure destruction of the Indigenous people. It shocked me that Jackson made it clear that his “goal was to extermination of the Muskogee Nation, their rhetoric claimed self-defense.” (pg 99) This pattern carried on throughout his presidency and then to future presidents, US poets, writers, and historians.
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  • Spring '17
  • Caleigh Cornell
  • Of Plymouth Plantation, Native Americans in the United States, Indigenous peoples of the Americas, Pocahontas

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