Replicase has 2 catalytic cores 2 or more polymerases at replication fork DNA

Replicase has 2 catalytic cores 2 or more polymerases

This preview shows page 5 - 8 out of 28 pages.

Replicase has 2 catalytic cores 2 or more polymerases at replication fork  DNA is packaged in nucleosomes primers are removed by ribonucleases Telomeres The ends of linear chromosomes in eukaryotes Are composed of many repeats of a 6 bp sequence (TTAGGG) followed by a G-rich  stretch They form T-loop structures that together with proteins (shelterin complexes)  protect the ends from degradation by exonucleases DNA ends cannot be fully replicated because of the need for a primer, therefore  results in ends growing shorter with each cell division Telomerase maintains these ends by adding the 6- bp sequence repeatedly in  numerous cycles using an RNA template and its reverse transcriptase activity
Image of page 5
Functions of RNA mRNA: messenger RNA  (codes for proteins) tRNA: transfer RNA (adaptor between nRNA and amino acids) rRNA: ribosomal RNA (catalyze protein synthesis) hnRNA: heterogenous nuclear (intermediate form and pre mRNA process to make  mRNA) snRNA: small nuclear (needed for mRNA maturation, part of the spliceosome) miRNA: micro RNA (controls gene expression) RNA polymerase Does not require a primer Synthesizes RNA from a DNA template in 5’ 3’ direction using rNTPs Uses the template strand to specify which rNTP to add Rna product is identical to the non-template strand (also called coding strand) but  has U replacing T Forms phosphodiester bonds Transcription in Prokaryotes A single RNA polymerase (alpha2betabeta’ core enzyme + sigma factor) Sigma factor responsible for promoter recognition  Sigma factor binds -35 (TTGACA) and -10 (TATAAT) sequence on the non  template strand positioning the polymerase relative to the +1 nucleotide (A) where  transcription can begin RNA polymerase core enzyme elongates the RNA transcript Termination can occur by a Rho- dependent or Rho-independent mechanism Rho-independent termination uses the formation of an RNA hairpin structure  resulting from the transcription of an inverted repeat sequence to slow the  polymerase, which then causes the RNA transcript to disengage from the polymerase through disruption of the weakly bonded U:T repeat sequence in the transcription  bubble Rho-dependent termination requires the binding of the rho protein to a specific  sequence near the 3’ end of the RNA followed by its movement towards the  polymerase causing it to disengage Transcription and translation are coupled in bacteria (since they are not physically  separated as they are in eukaryotes)
Image of page 6
Rho- Independent Rho-Dependent 
Image of page 7
Image of page 8

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 28 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture