L08b - NATS1610-fw1718 - UPDATED - Mitochondria and Cell Metabolism (1).pdf

Store surplus glucose as starch withdraw glucose when

Info icon This preview shows pages 16–23. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
STORE surplus glucose as starch withdraw glucose when it’s needed for energy n The glucose is used during cellular respiration Primary Consumers n FEED on primary producers, especially parts RICH in starch n To ACCESS the glucose stored in starch - to support their own metabolism n BREAK DOWN the starch into glucose n Glucose then is further broken down through CELLULAR RESPIRATION n To “release” the energy that’s “trapped” in the chemical bonds in glucose n And to “store” this energy in ATP molecules Through PHOTOSYNTHESIS , the primary producers (i.e., plants) form glucose & other carbohydrates
Image of page 16

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Let’s start by looking at what you already know about Starch & Glucose n What is starch? (from lab #2) n What’s the name of the enzyme that breaks down starch? (from lab #2) n Where is this enzyme found in our bodies? (from lab #2) 17
Image of page 17
18 Fig. 2.2-1 Fig. 3.6a Fig. 3.8 Figures from Brooker et al., Biology , 1/ed, McGraw-Hill Removing the Hydrogen’s electron creates a Hydrogen ion (H+) C 6 H 12 O 6 In plants In animals In plants Stored Glucose (carbohydrates)
Image of page 18

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cellular Respiration and Mitochondria 19
Image of page 19
20 Through CELLULAR RESPIRATION , cells access the biochemical energy “stored” in the chemical bonds of carbohydrates (chains of glucose) CELLULAR RESPIRATION n Process by which glucose (and some other sugars) is (are) BROKEN DOWN by ALL CELLS to yield carbon dioxide, water, and energy n Energy is in the form of ATP n Cellular respiration releases the energy STORED in the CHEMICAL BONDS of glucose ( C 6 H 12 O 6 ) to produce ATP this is what our bodies can use for energy n Through the BREAKDOWN of glucose n Note that ALL chemical bonds contain energy – but some contain more energy (like the phosphate bonds in ATP) n Cellular Respiration consists of THREE chemical pathways 1. Glycolysis 2. Krebs Cycle (Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle, Citric Acid Cycle) – oxygen requiring 3. Electron Transport Chain – oxygen requiring MITOCHONDRIA have vital roles in cellular respiration (pathways 2 & 3 above)
Image of page 20

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Organelles of an Animal Eukaryotic Cell nuclear envelope Nucleus Keeps DNA away from poten2ally damaging reac2ons in cytoplasm nucleolus DNA in nucleoplasm Cytoskeleton Structurally supports, gives shape to cell; moves cell and its parts microtubules microfilaments Ribosomes (a?ached to rough ER and free in cytoplasm) Sites of protein synthesis intermediate filaments Rough ER Modifies new polypep2de chains Mitochondrion Energy powerhouse; produces ATP by cellular respira2on Smooth ER Makes lipids, degrades fats, inac2vates toxins Centrioles Special centers that produce and organize microtubules Golgi Body Modifies, sorts, ships proteins and lipids for export or for inser2on into cell membranes Plasma Membrane Controls the kinds and amounts of substances moving into and out of cell Lysosome Digests, recycles materials Figure 3.5 - from Starr and McMillan, Human Biology , 10ed, Brooks Cole
Image of page 21
22 MITOCHONDRIA provide cells with ENERGY through the BREAKDOWN of GLUCOSE and the FORMATION of ATP molecules during cellular respiration OXYGEN REQUIRING series of metabolic reactions n Mitochondria require oxygen (O 2 ) n By inhaling
Image of page 22

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 23
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern