Kirst Ashman K K Hull G H Jr 2012 Understanding generalist practice 7th ed

Kirst ashman k k hull g h jr 2012 understanding

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parents to see a social worker and I was not always kind during the sessions.Kirst-Ashman, K. K., & Hull, G. H., Jr. (2012). Understanding generalist practice(7th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning. ReplyQuoteEmail AuthorMessage ReadMark as UnreadMessage Not FlaggedSet Flag1 month ago
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Access the profile card for user: Elaina Gonzales-BlantonElaina Gonzales-Blanton RE: Discussion 1 - Week 3COLLAPSESOCW-6101-28Challenges-I have had challenges in working with angry clients, clients who present like Stephanie did in the video. My brain tends to flip its lid when faced with someone who seems like they might become threatening. I have encountered this and so far have been able to keep myself calm and think through the situation and control the interview (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2012), but there havebeen times when I can feel myself starting to go into fight, flight or freeze mode and I have had to take a minute to myself to guide my brain back into calmness.Another challenge I sometimes face with my job is not wanting to cross that line with self-disclosure (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2012). In my field my clients usethe term “normies” in reference to people who are not like they are-addicts. Many of my clients use the term in a negative or even derogatory context because they feel that “normies” do not know anything about addiction. Therefore in order to gain their trust and respect I sometimes divulge that I have an eating disorder and that I am raising 3 step children because their mother is a drug addict. I try not to go too much into either subject, but I tell them enough to get them to see that I am no stranger to the world of addiction.Self-disclosure can sometimes benefit the client-social worker relationship (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2012), but it can also sabotage it. Clients may use your words against you later as they sometimes turn on you.
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Skills that I might excel at-I am a very positive minded person and I often see the bright side of things even when others may not. Therefore I believe that my positive outlook will help me to see strengths (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2012) in my clients which will help us to set goals which will help them to move forward.I have had some motivational interviewing training which uses reflective responding (Kirst-Ashman & Hull, 2012) and I believe that I possess this skill. Reflective responding is essential in clarifying where the client is emotionally and psychologically and I think I am good at this.Works CitedKirst-Ashman, K. K., & Hull, G. H., Jr. (2014). Understanding generalist practice(7th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.ReplyQuoteEmail AuthorMessage ReadMark as UnreadMessage Not FlaggedSet Flag1 month agoJames Eggert RE: Discussion 1 - Week 3COLLAPSEHello All,
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For me the challenges of using micro practice, depending on the client, can be empathy, sympathy, and indifference. Depending on the client’s situation and behavior, I can actually identify with their emotional pain which makes me vulnerable to become emotionally attached. At the opposite end of the spectrum, depending on the client’s situation and behavior, I can become
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