Points Earned 001 0 Correct Answers E 2 Look at the picture above which shows a

Points earned 001 0 correct answers e 2 look at the

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Points Earned: 0.0/1 .0 Correct Answer(s): E
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2. Look at the picture above which shows a region just less than a foot across, of a stream deposit from the base of the same pile of rocks that show up in Bryce Canyon. This picture was taken in the face of a cliff in Red Canyon, just west of Bryce Canyon National Park. A indicates a piece of limestone that has been rounded off in a stream; B indicates a mass of sand glued together by hard-water deposits, and C indicates another such mass of sand glued together by hard-water deposits . In order of time of formation, they are: A) A was formed first, then B was glued together by hard-water deposits, then C was glued together by hard-water deposits. B) B was glued together by hard-water deposits, then C was glued together by hard-water deposits, then A was formed. C) C was glued together by hard-water deposits, then B was glued together by hard-water deposits, then A was formed. D) C was glued together by hard-water deposits, then A was formed, then B was glued together by hard-water deposits. E) B was glued together by hard-water deposits, then A was formed, then C was glued together by hard-water deposits. Feedback: The clast A existed before it was included in a conglomerate glued together by the sand and hard-water deposits of B, so A is older than B; the whole reddish clast containing A and B is glued into another conglomerate by the sand and hard-water deposits of C, so C is youngest of these three. Points Earned: 0.0/1 .0 Correct A
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Answer(s): 3. Look at the picture above of a small dam across a stream bed (between the pink arrows) just above one of the trails into Bryce Canyon. When floods happen in the stream bed: A) They flow away from the camera; turbulent floodwaters have been undermining the small dam, and will cause it to collapse soon. B) They flow toward the camera; floodwaters have filled the space upstream of the dam and debris has started to cascade over the dam, so the dam is not serving to trap sediment any more. C) They sometimes flow toward the camera, and sometimes flow away from the camera, as shown by the occurrence of some debris on both sides of the dam. D) Actually, floods never occur; the dryness of the region, as shown by the sparse vegetation, prevents floods. E) They are caused by giant marmots digging through the retaining walls of the sewage-treatment facility at Bryce, which proved unpleasant for the marmots and the tourists. Feedback: Fast-flowing floods have lost their debris when slowed by the dam, filling the space above the dam with rocks. This basic pattern—dams collect debris and release clean(er) water that can erode more, is seen over and over in geology. And the sewage handling at Bryce is well-secured against tunneling marmots. Bryce does have some darned cute prairie dogs, though!
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