In the first three quatrains four line stanzas

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In the first three quatrains (four- line stanzas), Shakespeare uses three metaphors to let his beloved know that he (Shakespeaere) is near death. In lines 13-14, however, the turn occurs because Shakespeare states how the fact of his mortality will affect the relationship he has with his beloved. Sometimes Shakespeares sonnets turn at line 9 like the one below. Sonnet 18 1. Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? A 2. Thou art more lovely and more temperate: B 3. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, A 4. And summer's lease hath all too short a date: B 5. Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, C 6. And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; D 7. And every fair from fair sometime declines, C 8. By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd; D 9. But thy eternal summer shall not fade E 10. Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; F 11. Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade, E 12. When in eternal lines to time thou growest: F 13. So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, G 14. So long lives this and this gives life to thee. G In the octet of the sonnet above, Shakespeare begins comparing his subject to a summer day, an event associated with positive connotations. However, the remaining images in the sestet reveal

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