20 National Park Service Harry S Trumans Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb

20 national park service harry s trumans decision to

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20 National Park Service. “Harry S. Truman’s Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb.” Accessed June 9, 2019. .
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7 The final option was to drop the atomic bombs to shock the Japanese into quitting before more devastation was loosed on their nation. 21 President Truman and his advisors concluded that only bombing a city would make an impression. There was no advance warning to evacuate the city for fear of endangering the bomber crew; the Japanese could attempt to shoot them down. The targets were carefully chosen. First, the city could only have minimal damage from conventional bombing so it could not be argued that the damage came from anything other than the atomic bomb. Second, the city must be primarily devoted to military production. This was complicated, because the homes of Japanese workers were intermingled with factories, so it was nearly impossible to find that was exclusively military. Truman stipulated the chosen city should not be a city of traditional cultural significance, such as Kyoto. He did not want to destroy the Japanese culture or people; the goal was to destroy Japan’s ability to make war. 22 J. Robert Oppenheimer gave last minute instruction to the crew of the Enola Gay ; “Don’t let them bomb (Little Boy) through clouds or through overcast. Got to see the target. No radar bombing; it must be dropped visually….Of course, they must not drop it in rain or fog. Don’t let them detonate it too high. The figure fixed on is just right. Don’t let it go up or the target won’t get as much damage.” 23 On August 6, 1945 at 8:15 Colonel Paul Tibbet’s watch the aiming point came up – the slender branches of the Ota River and the Aioi Bridge. There was a “bombs away” signal and the bay door opened. Forty-three seconds later, with the Enola Gay at 31,600 feet and 21 Auer, James E., and Richard Halloran. “Looking Back at the Bomb.” Parameters: U.S. Army War College 26, no. 1 (March 1996): 127-28. 46002071&site=eds-live&scope=site. 22 National Park Service. “Harry S. Truman’s Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb.” Accessed June 9, 2019. . 23 Thomas Powers. “Was It Right?” Atlantic 276, no. 1 (July 1995): 21. - ebscohost-com.ezproxy.snhu.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=9507180568& site=eds-live&scope=site.
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8 racing away from the impact point in a 155 degree turn to the right “Little Boy” erupted 1,890 feet above Hiroshima.” 24 The city of Hiroshima disappeared and nearly 100,000 people died. Colonel Tibbets stated, “I think this is the end of the war Annotated Bibliography Auer, James E. and Richard Halloran. "Looking Back at the Bomb." Parameters U.S. Army War 24 Stanley Weintraub, The Last Great Victory: The End of World War II, July/August 1945 (New York, New York: Truman Talley Books, 1995), 422-23.
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9 College 26, no. 1 (March,1996): 127-35. http;//ezproxy.snhu.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F %2Fsearch.proquest.com%2Fdocview%2F1306228179% This essay asks the questions - was it justified that the United States dropped two atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki killing over 200,000 people. Did President Truman make the
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