By the model building code are type i fire resistant

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by the model building code are: Type I Fire Resistant Type II Noncombustible Type III Ordinary Type IV Heavy Timber Type V Frame
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9 Fire Resistance Resistance of a building and it’s structural components to either collapse or total involvement “Fire endurance” – Frank Brannigan Will the building burn? No, but contents do How will the building fare from a fire involving the contents? Depends on amount and type of materials
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Type I “Fire Resistant” Structural elements are constructed of noncombustible materials In addition, Structural elements are protected to the highest level Accomplished through encasement or spray on coating Fire resistance is an expensive feature 10
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11 Fire Resistive Construction
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Type II “Noncombustible” Structural elements are constructed of noncombustible materials Elements may or may not be protected Never are the Type II components protected to Type 1 levels Type IIA – Encased Type II B - Exposed 14
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15 Noncombustible Construction
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18 Type III “Ordinary” Simply referred to as “Ordinary” construction Exterior walls are noncombustible and fire rated Other elements may be combustible Columns, Girders and Beams Elements may or may not be protected Little protection and structural members are combustible
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Type III “Ordinary” Common in American cities and towns Masonry (usually brick) exteriors Wood floors, roofs, and partitions Plaster with wood lath was common Inexpensive and used extensively in first half of the 20 th Century 19
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Type III “Ordinary” Brick veneer construction is not Type III, but Type V. Brick Veneer walls are freestanding walls and non load bearing People often incorrectly refer to modern wood frame construction as “ordinary,” meaning “common” Ordinary” is Type III No longer is ordinary construction used due to high cost of masonry construction 20
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21 “Ordinary” Construction
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  • Fall '17
  • Building code, Type of Construction, Noncombustible Construction

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