Both plasmids and portions of bacterial chromosome

Info icon This preview shows pages 31–44. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Both plasmids and portions of bacterial chromosome.
Image of page 31

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Genome: Recombination via transduction Transfer of DNA via phage viruses .
Image of page 32
Reproduction & Growth Meiosis & Mitosis NOT PRESENT . Asexual binary fission . DNA replication can be nearly continuous in ideal conditions (depends on pH, salinity, temperature, etc.) Generation times as fast as 20 minutes
Image of page 33

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Metabolic Diversity • Nutrition: Requires a source of carbon for synthesizing organic compounds: either carbon dioxide or living matter. Requires a source of energy to drive reactions: either light or chemical. Metabolism
Image of page 34
Metabolic Diversity: Source of Carbon AUTOTROPHS : Need only carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) as carbon source HETEROTROPHS : Need at least one organic nutrient as carbon source (e.g. glucose; petroleum) Both of these present in domain Eucarya as well. Metabolism
Image of page 35

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Metabolic Diversity: Source of Energy PHOTOTROPHS : Need only sunlight as energy source CHEMOTROPHS : Derive energy from oxidation of organic molecules. Both of these present in domain Eucarya as well. Metabolism
Image of page 36
Metabolic Diversity: Combined Metabolism Energy Source: Sun Environment CO 2 Photoautotroph Chemoautotroph Organic molecules Photoheterotroph Chemoheterotroph Carbon Source:
Image of page 37

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Photoautotrophs Use sun for energy, CO 2 for carbon. • Photosynthetic bacteria (e.g. cyanobacteria). Present in many plants and single- celled Eucarya Metabolism
Image of page 38
Chemoautotrophs Oxidize inorganics (H 2 S, NH 3 ) for energy. Need only CO 2 as carbon source. Unique to Bacteria and Archaea. E.g. Methanococcus jannaschii lives on hydrothermal vents at 2600m below sea level. Metabolism
Image of page 39

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Photoheterotrophs Get energy from light but must obtain carbon in organic form (NOT CO 2 ). Unique to Bacteria and Archaea. • E.g. Halobacterium salinarium . Metabolism
Image of page 40
Chemoheterotrophs Consume organic molecules for both energy and carbon. Common among prokaryotes: saprobes (decomposers) parasites (rely on living hosts) Also widespread in Protista, Animalia, Plantae. Metabolism
Image of page 41

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Nitrogen metabolism Nitrogen fixation : The only* mechanism that makes atmospheric Nitrogen available to other organisms. Convert N 2 into ammonia (NH 3 ) which is quickly protonated into ammonium (NH 4 + ). Essential for multicellular life! Metabolism
Image of page 42
Oxygen Relationships Aerobic vs. Anaerobic Obligate aerobes : use O 2 for cellular respiration. Facultative anaerobes : use O 2 if it is present but carry out anaerobic respiration or fermentation in anaerobic environment.
Image of page 43

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 44
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern