It was this Abronychus who now arrived with news of what had befallen Leonidas

It was this abronychus who now arrived with news of

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It was this Abronychus who now arrived with news of what had befallen Leonidas and those who were with him. When the Greeks heard the news they no longer delayed to retreat, but withdrew in the order wherein they had been stationed, the Corinthians leading, and the Athenians sailing last of all. Now land and sea north of Peloponnese was lost to the Persians. But Xerxes paid for this. He lost 20,000 men at Thermopylae and half his ships were gone. His army now completely depended on his naval success.
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Trozen inscription (The Decree of Themistocles): Herodotus indicated that the Athenian evacuation was a mass emergency evacuation after the fall at Thermopylae. He suggests that it was an unorganised improvisation by particular members of the Athenian authorities. The Decree of Themistocles challenges this idea by presenting a planned evacuation of Athens dating back to before the battle of Thermopylae. The Trozen inscription is an inscription on a marble slab found in the 1930s came to the prominence in 1959 through the word of Professor M. Jameson. The inscription itself was dated to the third century BC and was meant to be a copy of the decree by Themistocles in the 5 th century BC. The inscription clearly shows the evacuation as a plan however, its reliability has been questioned. 3. Battle of Salamis (480 BC) Battle of Salamis: Topic: Greeks: Persians: Aims and overall strategy Defeat the Persian fleet so that they could not supply their army with men. Gain control of the sea so that the Persian could not get around the Pass at Isthmus. Defeat the Greek fleet. Gain control of the sea so that they could go around the pass at Isthmus. Logistics – preparation and resources The use of a small passage (again). The suggestion of the possible planned trickery of Xerxes. The Greeks small ships. They had 371 triremes and pentekonters (smaller fifty-oared ships). The use of ‘traitors’ to gain information about the enemy. The large Persian ships and numbers. Consisted of 1207 ships, although their original invasion force consisted of many more ships that had since been lost due to storms in the Aegean Sea and at Artemisium. Specific tactics and weapons used They used small passage to counter numbers of the Persians, they/Themistocles tricked Xerxes, the placement of Corinthian against Egyptian Squadron. Attack with numbers and while they are retreating and thus not prepared. Advantages They had the appropriate They had larger
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ships and they knew the seas. They had the advantage of smaller spaces. Themistocles made sure that the Greeks only attacked when the winds were in favour of them. numbers. Disadvantages They appeared not to be working in unity (questionable). The had smaller numbers They had little to no knowledge if the seas and they had large numbers for a small space.
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