There needs to be a shared understanding of standards and expectations between

There needs to be a shared understanding of standards

This preview shows page 83 - 86 out of 110 pages.

be able to visit the school to meet young people and staff prior to the visit. There needs to be a shared understanding of standards and expectations between the school and the residential centre activities offered should contain an element of personalisation and choice, and should be sufficiently challenging by taking account of and building on the previous experiences of the young people involved look at the activities offered and find out whether or not there is flexibility in the way in which these are facilitated to enable specific and agreed learning intentions to be met. It is essential that teachers and practitioners are involved in setting learning intentions as part of the planning process and that they actively assess the learning taking place during the residential in line with advice contained within Building the Curriculum 5: A framework for assessment
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OUTDOOR LEARNING: PRACTICAL GUIDANCE, IDEAS AND SUPPORT 84 teachers and practitioners need to have the option of participating in the residential activities. This provides an opportunity to observe and note the impact on the group and individual pupils when evaluating progress and the impact of the residential experience, the centre staff and the visiting staff should have an opportunity to share their observations. Time may also be built into the experience for pupils to reflect and self-assess their own personal development or learning journey gathering evidence of learning, achievements and personal development needs to be considered in advance. This evidence can take many forms, such as diaries, recordings, photo journals, blogs, Glow or project work. Certificates or individual awards at a final ceremony are an additional way of recognising achievement. Partners may have templates for certificates or logbooks the residential experiences need to take account of the design principles of Curriculum for Excellence. Partner providers should be able to advise on the potential of the experiences that they offer to support learning within and across curriculum areas look carefully at how the activities are constructed to ensure a holistic approach. Teaching staff and practitioners should know how particular activities impact on learning beyond simple participation. For example, a canoe trip could include activities that allow learners to consider human impact on water quality. A high ropes course located in a woodland can provide an opportunity to explore the canopy layers and woodland ecosystem. Team-building challenges may be specifically adapted to help a class understand an aspect of their interdisciplinary project
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85 find out about poor weather alternatives and contingency plans. These need to be positive substitutes for planned activities and should still have a focus on learning outcomes think about the support required to ensure that all young people have the opportunity to participate. Consider the accessibility of the site and the activities offered find out if there are opportunities to talk to partner staff about the group during the visit.
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