Prevalence of anemia among children of children under

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Prevalence of anemia among children (% of children under 5) 65.4 86.1 60.5 74.5 65.4 76.1 71.3 80.1 75.6 71.0 20.8 71.1 Prevalence of HIV, total (% of population ages 15-49) 1.1 0.9 0.5 2.7 3.2 1.3 3.7 0.9 0.4 3.2 0.5 2.3 Mortality rate, neonatal (per 1,000 live births) 26.9 26.9 11.4 37.5 37.4 29.3 44.0 40.2 27.5 37.4 23.0 30.4 Mortality rate, under-5 (per 1,000 live births) 85.3 97.6 26.0 100.0 117.4 78.4 123.9 122.7 104.2 117.4 55.3 84.7 Immunization, DPT (% of children ages 12-23 months) 69.0 88.0 93.0 88.0 58.0 90.0 80.0 74.0 70.0 58.0 92.0 84.0 Immunization, measles (% of children ages 12-23 months) 63.0 82.0 91.0 74.0 59.0 89.0 69.0 72.0 67.0 59.0 84.0 72.0 Hospital beds (per 1,000 people) 0.5 0.4 2.1 0.4 1.1 0.9 1.0 0.1 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.7 Physicians (per 1,000 people) 0.1 0.0 0.3 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.4 0.1 0.1 Lifetime risk of maternal death (%) 1.7 2.3 0.1 3.4 3.2 1.5 2.8 3.9 5.0 3.2 1.7 2.2 Improved sanitation facilities (% of population with access) 14.3 18.6 64.9 21.9 27.8 14.4 19.7 21.9 9.0 27.8 51.9 11.3 Newborns protected against tetanus (%) 93.0 88.0 92.0 82.0 60.0 88.0 80.0 85.0 81.0 60.0 91.0 77.0 Prevalence of undernourishment (% of population) 6.1 25.0 9.6 20.5 7.3 5.0 10.1 7.3 13.9 7.3 21.6 15.5 Life expectancy at birth, female (years) 60.5 56.5 78.5 51.2 52.4 61.9 55.6 54.5 58.1 52.4 64.7 57.0 Life expectancy at birth, male (years) 57.8 55.3 70.8 49.6 51.8 60.0 52.5 54.7 57.8 51.8 61.8 55.3 Life expectancy at birth, total (years) 59.1 55.9 74.5 50.4 52.1 60.9 54.0 54.6 58.0 52.1 63.2 56.2 Health expenditure per capita (current US$) 33.1 37.8 144.2 87.9 94.3 83.0 29.8 42.1 25.5 94.3 51.2 40.8 Health expenditure, public (% of GDP) 2.3 3.4 3.0 1.9 1.9 3.0 1.3 2.3 2.8 1.9 2.8 4.4 Improved water source (% of population with access) 76.1 81.7 89.3 80.2 64.0 87.2 73.6 67.2 52.3 64.0 74.1 60.0 Sources: World Development Indicators Database 2014. SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT OF EBOLA VIRUS DISEASE IN WEST AFRICAN COUNTRIES
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20 The long-standing cultural practices that people were understandably reluctant to abandon contributed to further spreading the infection. Due to the culture of burying the dead near their ancestors, corpses had to be moved long distances, therefore contributing to a resurgence. Caring for the sick by friends and relatives, who are predominantly women, is an important duty in these societies, but the provision of care by untrained and unequipped people accounts for the further spread of EVD. Moreover, the washing and dressing of the deceased is a show of respect in some of the cultures in the area, but again, further transmitted the disease. For this reason, the cremation of corpses of the victims was heavily resisted in these countries. Funeral and burial practices in these countries are exceptionally high risks. Evidence from Guinea shows that around 60 percent of the infections were caused by burial and funeral practices (WHO, 2015a). Evidence from the three epicentre countries also underscores the human rights dimension of EVD as an important source of anxiety and fear that renders people more vulnerable to the disease. The social, cultural, economic and other rights of the affected populations have been violated since the outbreak. The lack of respect for the right to information, participation and education, which created a culture of fear and mistrust, complicated the containment process and its effectiveness. Some of the measures taken by affected governments to stop the spread of the disease inadvertently and negatively affected the human rights to freedom of movement and assembly, the right to culture, and the freedom of religion. This is, to a large extent, one of the sources of strong resistance that made containment difficult in many communities.
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