Topical fluoride application prevention of dental

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Topical Fluoride Application Prevention of dental disease is a very important component of the overall oral health of children. Caries (dental decay) and periodontal problems (gum disease) can be eliminated and controlled through effective education of the patient and/or parents or guardians. Since prevention includes good home care, it’s important to instruct the patient in regular plaque removal by flossing and brushing. Topical fluoride treatments and pit and fissure sealants can be applied at the dental office to afford the tooth improved resistance to decay. In addition, a prescription fluoride product can be prescribed for use at home on a daily basis for patients with a high caries risk. This is usually applied immediately before the patient goes to bed so that no food passes through the mouth after the rinse. Although it’s not totally understood why fluoride makes teeth harder and resistant to decay, it’s known that fluoride is absorbed into the enamel of the tooth. Fluoride aids in remineralization of teeth that have undergone initial stages of demineralization caused by acids produced in plaque. This helps keep enamel more resistant to decay. After prophylaxis with a prophy paste or other such material to remove plaque, the teeth are well cleaned, and the patient is asked to rinse
Dental Specialties 2: Pediatric Dentistry/Orthodontics 11 and expectorate. Teeth are then isolated and dried with a saliva ejector, using cotton rolls as needed. Fluoride can also be applied to the patient’s teeth by means of a fluoride tray. The trays, made of a pliable, soft plastic material and usually disposable, provide an efficient means of application. A small measured amount of fluoride gel is placed into the troughs of the tray. The patient’s teeth are dried, and the tray is then inserted into the patient’s mouth. The fluoride in the troughs covers the teeth. Studies of fluo- ride uptake have shown that a one-minute application is generally effective. In the past, four-minute applications were deemed necessary for ideal treatment. Since two different types of fluoride are used (neutral sodium fluoride or acid phosphate fluoride ), the manufacturer’s recommended instructions for the fluoride being used should be followed. Flouride can also be applied as a solution. After the teeth are dried and isolated with cotton rolls, the fluoride solution can then be applied directly to the teeth with a cotton-tipped applicator. When using this application method, the fluoride should be worked into the interproximal areas (between the teeth). This method, however, doesn’t control the amount of flouride that a patient can ingest as well as using a gel. It’s important to limit the ingestion of the fluoride; therefore, suction should be applied between the trays. Suction removes excess saliva caused by the taste of the fluoride and the presence of unfamiliar objects in the mouth.

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