B if you are arguing for socialism it wont help to

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(b) If you are arguing for socialism, it won't help to begin with the idea that Josef Stalin (former authoritarian leader of the Soviet Union, much despised in the West) was actually a good democratic man of the people. A better rhetorical strategy would be to tap into the belief that those who produce the world's wealth should not be exploited by a minority who live off their labour. Many people, even if they do not consider themselves socialist, would accept that. (c) If you are arguing for capitalism, it won't help to begin with the idea that it's good if a small minority controls most of the wealth of the world. A rhetorically better strategy would be to tap into the (widespread) belief that state (government) control of the economy in the Communist systems was authoritarian and inefficient and go from there to arguing that capitalism is preferable. The point is that good, effective propaganda and rhetoric has to tap into the beliefs of the target audience . 2) Plato also thought that sometimes, to have a lasting effect, it makes sense to break the above rule: to shock the audience with the depth of one's own conviction and one's sacrifice for that conviction : making oneself a martyr, for example, may have a long-term effect even if not effective in the short-term. This is the second technique. Example : Socrates (Plato’s teacher and usually the first philosopher introduced in western philosophy courses) refused to accept his accusers' prejudices in order to avoid the death penalty. Instead of repenting for ‘corrupting the youth’ and instilling belief in false gods (this is what he was accused of), he told the jurors that the state should pay his expenses and maintain him for helping citizens to question the state and to be critical of the prevailing customs and ideologies (see p. 39 of our text). Obviously, this wasn’t going to endear him to his accusers and in fact, they gave him the death penalty. But, although he paid the price with his life, that was effective propaganda, it had a lasting effect: Socrates is still revered and his message is taken to heart more than that of his accusers (he was accused of 'corrupting the youth' by encouraging them to question traditional authorities and to worship 'false gods').
Another Example : the Tunisian man who burned himself alive, an action that triggered the so-called ‘Arab Spring’—the democratic uprisings in the Arab world in 2011. That was an act of propaganda—a very effective one, for which he sacrificed his life. Another (obvious) Example : Jesus dying on the cross—pretty effective and long-lasting propaganda, I’d say! 3) This third technique is probably the one Plato is most famous for: what he called the 'Noble Lie' . Without going into the particular ‘noble lie’ Plato wanted to push on the masses, here’s the basic idea: tell the people myths that will persuade them to keep in their places and NOT to rebel against the established system of power and authority.

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