A second contributor to the growing breakdown of

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A second contributor to the growing breakdown of democracy is our growing gap between rich and poor. Among our most cherished core values is our belief that the United States is a "land of opportunity" and that we uniquely offer to our citizens the potential for rising from "rags to riches" provided that citizens have the necessary ability and work hard. This develops into a major intellectual gap and political instability. Rising prices, makes basic things unaffordable. There isn’t an increase on spending on goods like infrastructure, education and things like that. Voting rights for minorities have been purged. Civil liberties like police hate crimes. Low voting turnouts. Natural Rights – rights to which all people are entitled by their very nature as human beings, such as those cited in the Declaration of Independence: “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.” Mayflower Compact – the Pilgrims’ covenant for governing the Plymouth colony. Although neither a declaration of independence nor a constitution, it came to symbolize how Americans could join for common purposes. Consent of the governed – the principle that no one has the right to govern another without that other person’s consent.
Separation of powers – an essential principle of the first American state constitutions and the U.S. Constitution according to which the legislative, executive, and judicial powers of government are assigned to three distinct institutions. Enumeration of powers – listing of powers. The enumerated powers in the Constitution are the 17 express powers that Article I, Section 9, of the Constitution specifically grants to Congress. Article I - the legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in Congress Federalism – powers are divided and shared among local and national authorities (the middle form between confederal and unitary) Articles of Confederation – the first national constitution for the United States. In force from 1781 to 1789, it created a single-branch national government (Congress) in which each state had one vote. Compound Republic – proposed in The Federalist papers by Madison who wanted the new Constitution ratified. #51 sells the concept that we don’t just have one republic with one government but we have ‘two distinct governments’ and then those are divided into departments (governor, legislator, cabinet, state court, etc.). The states provide the necessary check on the federal and vice versa. A compound republic is a combination between a Confederation and a Unitary form of government. Closely related to federalism. Energy in the executive – Federalist #70 titled “The Executive Department Further Considered,” is an essay written by Hamilton arguing for unitary executive provided for in the U.S. Constitution.

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