feflow_user_manual_classic.pdf

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_ÉÑçêÉ ëí~êíáåÖ íç ëÉí ìé íÜÉ Pa ãçÇÉäI äç~Ç íÜÉ ë~îÉÇ *.fem ÑáäÉ E q_mass_s2d_c.fem F çÑ íÜÉ Oa ãçÇÉä ÅêÉ~íÉÇ ÄÉÑçêÉK data flow lists displays Figure 10.20 3D-Layer configurator. slice definition
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cbcilt SKM `ä~ëëáÅ ö NQP NMKQ qÜÉ Pa jçÇÉä päáÅÉë Slices are surfaces on which the finite element nodes are located. They represent the topography and the discontinuities between the stratigraphic units or just subdivide layers to refine the vertical spatial dis- cretization. On slices you assign Initial conditions and , Boundary conditions . i~óÉêë Each layer is bounded by two slices. Layers contain the Material properties . For the construction of 3 lay- ers you need 4 slices . Model layers represent the strati- graphic layers and their subdivisions. In particular cases a layer also can be considered as initially dry (so- called ’air-layer’) which is useful to model free-surface problems such as mine flooding. On layers you assign Material parameters . Now you have to define how many layers/slices you need: The upper aquifer is limited by the ground sur- face at the top and by an aquitard at the bottom. The second aquifer is situated below that aquitard, under- lain by a till layer of unknown vertical extension. First we create the slices necessary for the description of the stratigraphy. Figure 10.21 Schematic view of a model - slices and layers. päáÅÉ N päáÅÉ O päáÅÉ P päáÅÉ Q i~óÉê N i~óÉê O i~óÉê P
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NQQ ö rëÉêÛë j~åì~ä J m~êí ff NMK qìíçêá~ä Enter an Elevation of top slice of 10000 m and a Decrement of 100 m in the Reference data section (Fig- ure 10.22) and change the number of slices from 2 to 4. This should be sufficient to precisely re-assign the stratigraphic data for each slice later without running the risk of interfering with previous slices. Create three layers (four slices) by entering the value in the corre- sponding input field (Figure 10.22) and hitting <Enter>. The Slice partitioner pops up (Figure 10.23) where you can decide where the new slices should be positioned (Figure 10.23 a, c); place them below the bottom slice. Next we should have a look at the data-flow dia- grams to the right of the layer configurator. It shows that the slice information of the former top slice/layer is inherited by the new one. The same is valid for the bottom slice/layer. NMKQKOKN Pa ëäáÅÉ ÉäÉî~íáçå Leave the Layer configurator via the Okay button. The explicit assigning of z -elevations for every node at a slice is done via the 3D-slice elevation menu of the Problem editor . Here you can select every slice and assign the z -elevations using the stan- dard tools of FEFLOW. Select the slices by clicking on the corresponding numbers in the layers & slices browser and Assign ( Akima linear, 0% over- undershooting) the databases according to the list (Table 10.7). Start with the lowest slice in order to avoid intersections with the other slices. In case of an intersection due to the inter-
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