p 75 FALSE 57 p 77 TRUE 58 p 77 FALSE 59 p 78 TRUE 60 p 79 TRUE 61 p 78 FALSE

P 75 false 57 p 77 true 58 p 77 false 59 p 78 true 60

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(p. 75) FALSE57.(p. 77) TRUE58.(p. 77) FALSE59.(p. 78) TRUE60.(p. 79) TRUE61.(p. 78) FALSE62.(p. 79) TRUE63.(p. 81) TRUE64.(p. 81) TRUE65.(p. 81) FALSE66.(p. 82) TRUE67.(p. 82) TRUE68.(p. 83) FALSE69.(p. 83) FALSE70.(p. 83) FALSE71.(p. 83) FALSE72.(p. 84) TRUE73.(p. 84-85) FALSE74.(p. 85) FALSE
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75.(p. 85) TRUE76.(p. 825) FALSE77.(p. 86) TRUE78.(p. 86) FALSE79.(p. 86) TRUE80.(p. 86) FALSE81.(p. 86-87) TRUE82.(p. 88) FALSE83.(p. 89) FALSE84.(p. 890) FALSE85.(p. 91) TRUE86.(p. 69) Pay structure refers to the array of pay rates for different work or skills within a single organization. The number of levels, the differentials in pay between the levels, and the criteria used to determine those differences describe the structure.(3) Criteria: Content and Value - Work content and its value are the most common bases for determining internal structures. Content refers to the work performed in a job and how it gets done. Value refers to the worth of the work: its relative contribution to the organization objectives. A structure based on content typically ranks jobs on skills required, complexity of tasks, problem solving, and/or responsibility. In contrast, a structure based on the value of the work focuses on the relative contribution of these skills, tasks, and responsibilities to the organization's goals.(2) Differentials - It may be defined as the pay differences among levels. One intention of differentials is to motivate people to strive for promotion to a higher-paying level.(1) Number of Levels - One feature of any pay structure is its hierarchical nature: the number of levels and reporting relationships. Some are more hierarchical, with multiple levels; others are compressed, with few levels.87.(p. 71-74) An internal pay structure can be defined by (1) the number of levels of work, (2) the pay differentials between the levels, and (3) the criteria used to determine those levels and differentials.88.(p. 76) The theory of marginal productivity says that employers pay use value. Unless an employee can produce a value equal to the value received in wages, it will not be worthwhile to hire that worker. One job is paid more or less than another because of differences in relative productivity of the job and/or differences in how much a consumer values the output.89.(p. 79) Internal labor markets combine both external and organizational factors. Internal labor markets refer to the rules and procedures that (1) determine the pay for the different jobs within a single organization and (2) allocate employees among those different jobs.Procedural justice refers to the process by which a decision is reached: the right to an attorney, the right to an impartial judge, and the right to receive a copy of the arresting officer's statement. Distributive justice refers to the fairness of the decision: guilty.Two sources of fairness are important: the procedures for determining the pay structure, called procedural justice; and the results of those procedures—the pay structure itself—called distributive justice.90.(p. 80) Employees judge the fairness of their pay through comparisons with the compensation paid to others for work related in some fashion to
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