Bio CH 19 answer key.docx

Safety pr ecautions caution students that scissors

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Safety Pr ecautions Caution students that scissors may be sharp . Visually impaired students will benefit from a verbal description of the activity set up and the observations. Gifted students may benefit from the opportunity to expand the activity or take it in different directions to explore the concepts of natural selection and evolution. Answers to Analysis Questions 1. Colour, size, and number are three obvious characteristics that will vary within the population. There will likely be others, depending on the variation in the population. 2. (a) Male birds that reproduced were chosen on the basis of characteristics identified by the teacher. Students should list these characteristics. F emales selection of mates with specific traits, such as bright air sacs and long tail feathers, determined which male bird would reproduce. (b) The next generation of males will look more like the males that reproduced than the population of males in the previous generation. 3. Traits suggested must all be apparent to the female grouse at the time of mate selection. These may include size, vigour, or type of dancing done by the male grouse —any specific phenotypic characteristic is acceptable. 4. If females choose the healthiest and strongest males as mates, the advantage would be that the males who reproduce are best suited to the environment, as long as the environment does not change. The population thus benefits by having a next generation that is well suited to the environment. The disadvantage is that some genetic diversity may be lost. Non-mating males may have alleles that are advantageous in other situations that are not passed to the next generation. Assessment Options Collect and assess students answers to Analysis questions. Use Assessment Checklist 3 Performance Task Self- Assessment from Appendix A.
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8-12 MHR Unit 8 Population and Community Dynamics 19.1 Student Textbook pages 678-688 Section Outcomes Students will: define a gene pool as the sum of all the alleles for all the genes in a population describe the gene pool of a population at genetic equilibrium, as well as the molecular basis for gene pool change summarize the five conditions upon which the Hardy- Weinberg principle is based describe how the Hardy-Weinberg equation is used to determine whether a population is undergoing microevolution calculate allele and genotype frequencies in a population, as well as the number of individuals with specific genotypes, and interpret the data conduct an investigation to simulate gene pool change and analyze the data Key Terms po pul ati on ge nes allele gene pool genotype frequency phenotype fr equency allele frequency Hardy-Weinberg principle Hardy-Weinberg equation genetic equilibrium microevolution Biology Backgr ound Populations consist of individuals, and individuals carry a variety of genes. Population genetics is the study of all the genetic variation contained in all the individuals of the population. This variation constitutes the gene
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