Comic books dont intimidate struggling readwith an

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read for beginning level and reluctant readers. “Comic books don’t intimidate struggling readers with an overwhelming page of text. They usually offer short and easy-to-read sentences, alongside other visual and text cues (e.g. character sighs, door slams, etc.) for context. They’re also helpful for children with learning difficulties; children with autism can learn a lot about identifying emotions through the images in a comic book.” (“The Awesome Benefits of Comic Books for Children”, 2015). People tend to think that because of the lack of text, comic books are less superior to novels in terms of literature and learning how to read. Yet, the reduced text in comic books acts as an advantage for readers -- especially beginning readers -- and the visuals help readers remember the content better and conveys messages they might not have been able to
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COMICS ARE COOL 8 pick up from just reading long lines of text. The layout of comics are helpful to students thanks to their ability to help people with visuals. The combination of art and writing is what helps people with learning. Comics are known for the combination of art and writing, and because of that, it is crucial that the author can write well. When a person thinks back on a memory, how much can they remember? They usually know the main idea of what happened, but sometimes they can’t get the full picture. Sherry Ellis talks about a time when she was a child eating dinner with her family and how she remembered but only remembered the room and her clothes from pictures (Ellis, 2006). People usually remember general things, but they don’t tend to remember the small details that made up that memory such as maybe the place, the people they were with, the clothes they wore, or what time of day it was. Ellis encourages, as an exercise, to take time in life that is memorable and then make up the non-memorable parts to create a new scene mixed with fiction and nonfiction. By doing this, it helps with writing out general scenes a person can have in mind about a story they wish to write. Just like how people don’t remember every single detail, an author doesn’t have every detailed worked out, so sometimes they just gotta go for it and link together the small ideas together to make a bigger scene. Not only are scenes very important to a story, but character development is also crucial in creating relatable characters the general audience will enjoy reading about. New writers often get told to start by writing in their point of view to get a taste of writing from someone else’s point of view. An essential part of writing is to make a character and characterize their personalities and motivation. Sometimes, it is best to step into another person’s perspective and practice writing through the psyche of someone else before writing about a fictional character (Ellis, 2006). People usually like characters they emphasize with and usually like the characters that feel more human than not. No one likes a “mary sue”, so
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COMICS ARE COOL 9 no one would want to read about a person like that. Creating characters with human traits along
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