Shakespeare being equivocal also made me think that

This preview shows page 5 - 6 out of 6 pages.

Shakespeare, being equivocal, also made me think that perhaps this is a warning, or a lesson for the younger generations, who are probably not as wise as he is. However, a third option is that he could be encouraging people to love and life in the moment and not worry about death; as if almost to say that if you do love deeply, you will not be missing out on life. I can see these two lines as being a code to live by because in Shakespeare’s eyes, even though you know your fate is death, loving is living to the fullest. My fourth theory is that perhaps Shakespeare was using nature, something everyone is familiar with, yet not scared of, to help people see that death is not scary. By relating it to the time of the year or time of the day, it may make people feel more at easy when talking about death. I feel at times Shakespeare is even saying, “Well, death is like going to sleep” and comparing it to things people do and see every day. Perhaps the tone in the quatrains where the comparisons are present is more playful than the couplet. The couplet is where I feel the tone changes to a more serious note.Our lives, as Shakespeare has proven, will die out like the seasons, time of day, and flames do. He believes there is only one way to live to the fullest, which is to love before our time is over or before the time of our loved ones runs out. The sonnet form truly helps Shakespeare capture this powerful meaning. Each quatrain represents something that every one does or sees every day, which can ultimately ease people about death. The quatrains also allow Shakespeare to split up his thoughts equally and devote four lines to 5
Alexa Angeloneeach comparison of his life to nature. The set up and order of the quatrains add to the dying aspect by starting out with something that lasts longer, seasons, and ending with something that cannot last, a flame. The couplet, however, is where Shakespeare’s tone shifts to a move serious one than before. In my opinion, this is what sets sonnets apart from other poems because it is where he wraps up his idea and leaves the audience with two powerful lines. The effect of this poem, “That time of year thou mayst in me behold”, would not have been as great if William Shakespeare had written it in any other form.Works Cited1. Kennedy, X. J., and Dana Gioia. "Chapter 21 - Poems for Further Reading." An Introduction to Poetry. 13th ed. Boston: Longman, 2010. 458. Print.6

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture