Cane ridge kentuckyone of the earliest revivals 1801

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Cane Ridge, Kentucky—one of the earliest revivals, 1801. Thousands upon thousands attended, 10-25,000 attended. Middle of nowhere, lasted 5 days and lead by group of Baptists, presy and Methodists. People wildly enthusiastic, and this fever spread, moves out from west to east. By 1820’s-1830, revivalism is throughout Western New York became known as Burned Over District—scorched by the fire and fever of revivalism. What happened at these revivals? They followed particular pattern, and differed from traditional services. They were planned in advanced, publicizing, and network of people in area about upcoming revivals. Why did they have to be well publicized? Nobody would go, they were events that happened on no particular schedule, they are episodic, no one knows when next one occurs, so you better go. Camp revivals-held outdoors, in tents, fields, they were different from traditional church services. The preachers at the revivals traveled from place to place, itinerant, spread gospel as they
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traveled around, they were trained ministers, but a good many were not formally trained ministers, maybe artisans, farmers, or laborers who felt the revivals, they had been infused with revivalism and wanted to spread it around. It is not just who is preaching or where, but the Great Revival had a different message. They offered their listeners a new message. Central to this message was that religion should come from the heart. Ministers wanted to appeal to the hearts rather than to the mind to those at the revivals. For decades and centuries, ministers tried to explain religion intellectually. Revivalists preached in vivid language, promises of heaven and dangers of hell, wanted audience to fear damnation, they appealed to senses. They stressed the sensory, experience of religion. Religion could be experienced by the entire body. The audiences would follow exercises, they would bark like dogs or roll on the ground like dogs…they touched the entire body. It was a physical experience. The ultimate goal of these revivals was conversion…give their souls to God. Perfectionism—philosophy developed by Charles Grandison Finney. Based on the idea that men and women could voluntarily cease to commit all sins, thus making yourself perfect. This is starkly different from the Puritans. Finney refuses to believe that human beings were simply, they are not simple, they can chose to quit committing sin. Finney thought sin was a choice and believed that any human being had power to renounce sin. According to him, any man or women who truly desired could experience conversion and perfectionism. Impact of the 2 nd Great Awakening First, the ideas of these revivals made people believed that through the power of prayer/conversion, people could be perfected which means that it meant that people could be reformed. More importantly, ALL of society could be reformed. As a result of this new mindset, we have voluntary organizations and the spread became known as the Benevolent Empire—people came together for missionary, groups and organizations whose purpose was to get rid of misery, pain of outcasts. One effects of
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