son Felix arrives dashing him to the ground and striking him violently with a

Son felix arrives dashing him to the ground and

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son Felix arrives, “[dashing him] to the ground and [striking him] violently with a stick” (Shelley 161), which he does despite the creature’s good intentions. Another instance with the creature is when he was shot by the man after saving a little girl from drowning in the lake. The creature later on exclaims, “This was then the reward of my benevolence! I had saved a human being from destruction, and as a recompense, I [get a] shattered...flesh and bone” (Shelley 169). Indeed, his good intentions were interpreted as evil simply because of his physical appearance, and in return, the creature gets shot. This injustice against the creature embodies the cruel violence he experiences despite his efforts to civilize himself into society and to understand the world around him. Nonetheless, his efforts and goodwill gets repaid with punishment, hatred, and rejection. Following that, there is a point in the novel where a promise is broken. Judith suggests that “In theory, the typical promise is a contract, a bilateral agreement of some sort…”. In this case, when Victor is face to face with the creature he says to him, “‘I consent to your demand, on your solemn oath to quit Europe forever, and every other place in the neighborhood of man, as soon as I shall deliver into your hands a female who will accompany you in your exile.’” (Shelley 178) This is Victor’s promise to the creature that he will make him a female companion, but later on Victor breaks that promise and destroys the creature’s female companion. Again, stated by Judith, “Those who make unilateral promises especially do have something to give, and
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to that extend they are the stronger of the two parties, and they can potentially abuse their power. From the point of view of the victim, certainly, the broken promise is an abuse of power, and that is what makes it unjust.” In relation to the story, Victor is the “stronger” one of the two parties, as he is the ultimate deciding factor of the promise, since he provides the knowledge and capability of creating a monster. However, he “abuses” his power when he breaks his promise, connecting with the concept of natural injustice. Aside from the violation of natural laws presented in the novel, there is also an instance of injustice associated with Justine Moritz. In the story, she gets neglected by her cruel mother and gets sent away to live with the Frankenstein’s. She becomes the victim of guilt, blame and injustice. Bowerbank notes that, “Justine, now one of the social outcasts, is even bullied into confessing in order to avoid spiritual excommunication; the community and the father seem content to rest on her lie.” Justine later on gets accused of and condemned for William’s death, without fair reason. Levine also states that “Justine even admits to a crime she did not commit in order to regain a lost trust, and the gesture is, of course, suicidal.” In the novel, Justine goes on to say, “I did confess, but I confessed a lie. I confessed, that I might obtain absolution; but now that falsehood lies heavier at my heart than all my other sins.” (Shelley 97). When she gets
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