Grand larceny thefts of property Burglary trespassory breaking and entering of

Grand larceny thefts of property burglary trespassory

This preview shows page 10 - 13 out of 27 pages.

Grand larceny: thefts of propertyBurglary- trespassory breaking and entering of propertyFalse Pretenses- Obtaining title to someone else’s property by knowingly or recklessly making a false representation of existing material fact that is intended to and does defraud the victim into parting with his or her propertyUnlike larceny- title passes to the thiefFiling false claims with insurance companies, the buying of a VCR with a check the purchaser knows will bounce, and the taking of buyer’s money for goods and services with no intent of delivering such goods or servicesEmbezzlement (fraudulent conversion of the property of another by one who has lawful possession of itOverlaps with larceny, but the original possession by the wrongdoer is unlawful
Background image
Attorney who receives funds from a client for payment of a settlement but later decides to spend the money on him or herself insteadState v. JoyNot debtor-creditor relationship but instead agent and principal therefore needed to pay herRobbery- stealing from a person or in his or her presence by use of force or threat of forceRemoving someone’s earring by stealth would be larceny, ripping it from the victim's ear would be robberyForgery- the false making or altering of a legally significant instrument (such as a check, credit card, deed, passport) with the intent to defraudWriting an insufficient funds check is not forgery but changing the true payee’s name as written on a check to your own and cashing the check is forgeryArson- Malicious burning of the property of anotherThe building burned need not be a dwelling housePeople who burn their own house for purposes of defrauding an insurance company are violating fraud statutesFederal Crimes Affecting BusinessMail and wire fraudUse of mails to defraud or use of telephone, telegraph, radio to defraudEx: false representation to sell products or securitiesAnti-trustSecurities lawRacketeer Influenced and Corrupt Org Act (RICO)Attack organized crime, especially its infiltration into legitimate businessContains both criminal and civil penaltiesComputer Crimes*** know stuff at the topThree types(1) Unauthorized access(2) Theft of information(3) Theft of funds*** if someone steals data it is theft tooExamplesStealing a competitor’s computer programPaying an accomplice to delete adverse information and insert favorable false information into the defendant’s credit fileA bank president’s having his or her account computer coded so that his or her checks would be removed and held rather than posted so he or she could later remove the actual checks without their being debitedA disgruntled ex-employee’s inserting a virus into his former employer’s computerto destroy its records
Background image
Three computer hackers’ foray into the forbidden recesses of computers that ran a large telecommunications company's phone network
Background image
Image of page 13

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 27 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture