fied with regard to healthcare provision that required follow up or extended

Fied with regard to healthcare provision that

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fied with regard to healthcare provision that required follow-up or extended care across regions or borders as well as access to specialized care, such as mental, sexual, prenatal, occupational, dental and ocular health services. While the aforementioned issues were found consistently among both Jamaican and Mexican workers, most Mexican workers face the additional burden of being unable to communicate di-rectly with either employers or healthcare providers, constituting a significant barrier to report-ing concerns and negotiating healthcare access. The Mexican government has provided workers with a health translation sheet, which is a welcome and useful resource. This research found, however, that workers generally did not make use of this sheet during medical consultations. At the same time, physicians who had not received these sheets indicated that they would appreci-ate support for translation.Access to Healthcare in Mexico and JamaicaSystems of transnational migration often fail to sufficiently provide for the long-term health needs of migrants. The Global Commission on International Migration has documented the con-cern that “less than 25 per cent of international migrants work in countries with bilateral or mul-tilateral social security agreements, and such agreements do not necessarily provide the same portability for healthcare benefits.”21Likewise, recent research conducted on returning Mexican migrants from the United States concluded that they are “uniquely disadvantaged for accessing health insurance.”22The SAWP presents similar challenges. Although participants receive health coverage in Canada, these benefits are not long-term or portable. Sick or injured workers normally have nowhere to reside in Canada outside of their employers’ residences and their health coverage expires after each year’s contract completion. They are, therefore, normally repatriated if they become too sick or injured to continue working.If a worker’s illness or injury is deemed to be work-related, they may be eligible for coverage under workers’ compensation; these benefits can be received and extended after workers return home. Not all work-related illnesses and injuries are recognized or reported as such, however, and workers face barriers to filing for claims similar to those they encounter to access healthcare. For example, many healthcare providers are not aware of migrant workers’ entitlements to com-pensation and migrants are often hesitant to report incidents. Repatriations that occur prior to workers’ conditions being fully investigated or resolved can lead to further difficulties and com-plications in assessing workers’ conditions and accessing their entitlements.Workers who develop conditions that are not work-related in Canada are eligible for some limited support under supplemental plans to which they contribute in Canada, which differ by country of origin. Mexicans pay into a private insurance plan, while Jamaican workers are covered under a
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  • Spring '12
  • Human migration, Migrant worker

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