Use emphasis and show associations in your mind map

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Use emphasis and show associations in your Mind Map. 14.3.7. NON-VERBAL CUES Verbal and non-verbal behaviour should be consistent to express passion and enthusiasm for a topic. These non-verbal elements stimulate the senses of the audience and make the speech interesting for them. The audience would feel mentally and emotionally involved with the message. Gestures and facial expressions are like the seasoning on a well prepared meal, adding to the experience of a speech. Although these have been explained in detail in the chapter on non-verbal communication here are a few tips to highlight their importance in public speaking: General Appearance In public speaking, it is important to remember that the audience’ first encounter with the speaker forms the vital first impression. The posture, the clothes and accessories, the general grooming, all contribute towards the ultimate impact that we want to create on audience mind. The speaker needs to pay attention to his attire and dress according to the environment and sensibilities of the audience. Even the culture becomes a decisive factor on the appearance and its effect on human interaction. Posture There is no one right posture that is always fit for all occasions. The posture needs to be determined looking at the objective, the purpose, the type of audience
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162 and the message to be put across. Deciding upon the right posture, therefore, is a matter of first understanding the environment and then going for a natural one. The speaker who slouches conveys resignation, lack of enthusiasm, anxiety and uncertainty and one who stands erect like a soldier fails to develop the bond with the audiences. Some sit on the chair while talking. The sitting on the table posture conveys over confidence, aggression and also slight informality. Facial Expression Facial expressions give a clue to the listener about the speaker’s involvement with the speech. Lack of expressions on the face, to some extent is a sign of lack of passion and enthusiasm. A confident expression on the face develops a positive bond with the audience that creates their interest in the topic. Eye Contact The eye can transcend all boundaries of space. The speaker can scan the audience sitting at the farthest corner to engage the person in the talk. Establish eye contact with the entire audience before beginning to speak. It does not mean looking at each one, but initially a glance across the entire room, starting from one side and moving to the next. Look at everybody and all sides while talking. It is a common mistake to only look at one side of the audience, or only front rows. Movements and Gestures Physical movement can be used by the speaker very subtly to draw and capture the attention of the audience. By moving around, the speaker can involve those who are otherwise feeling dull or relaxed. Gestures, sweeping movement of the arms and head nods, help communicate and reinforce the meaning. Natural body movements help the speaker build a rapport with the audience. It must be
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