Saminathan v Pappa 1981 1 MLJ 121 at p 126 Lord Diplock when delivering the

Saminathan v pappa 1981 1 mlj 121 at p 126 lord

This preview shows page 11 - 13 out of 22 pages.

fraud in civil proceedings. InSaminathan v Pappa[1981] 1 MLJ 121 at p 126, Lord Diplock when deliveringthe advice of the Board said that, 'The onus of proof of fraud in Malaysia is proof beyond reasonable doubt.'1997 2 MLJ 62 at75We pause to observe that the dictum of Lord Atkin inNarayanan Chettyarhas not received universalacceptance.InRejfek, the High Court of Australia rejected the Atkin test for reasons that appear in the following passageof the judgment:This court decided in 1940 inHelton v Allen(1940) 63 CLR 691 that in a civil proceeding, facts which amount to thecommission of a crime have only to be established to the reasonable satisfaction of the tribunal of fact, a satisfactionwhich may be attained on a consideration of the probabilities. This decision was arrived at after due consideration ofthe dictum of Lord Atkin in the case ofNew York v Heirs of Phillips (dec'd)[1939] 3 All ER 952 at p 955, and a carefulexamination of its meaning and its acceptability.Helton v Allenthus established that the criminal standard of proof isinappropriate to the determination of any such fact in any civil action tried in any court in Australia where there are nostatutory provisions to the contrary. That decision is binding on all courts in Australia unless and until there is a precisedecision to the contrary by the court or by the Privy Council.However, the Full Court of Queensland inKing v Crowe[1942] St R Qd 288 appears to have thought that a sentence inthe judgment of the Privy Council delivered by Lord Atkin inNarayanan Chettyar v Official Assignee of the High Court,Rangoonwas a decision to the contrary of this court's decision inHelton v Allen; and, accordingly, did not follow thatcase.But, in our opinion, it is abundantly clear that the sentence in the judgment delivered inNarayanan Chettyar v Official Page 11
Image of page 11
Assignee of the High Court, Rangoon was obiter: the preceding and the following sentence of the judgment make that evident. The question of the appropriate standard of proof does not appear to have been considered by their Lordships in that case as a matter arising before them nor were any authorities discussed; in particular, the decision of this court in Helton v Allen does not appear to have been considered. Further, the validity of the proposition of law which that sentence in the judgment of the Privy Council appears to assert was examined by Davidson J in Hocking v Bell (1944) 44 SR (NSW) 468 at p 478 in the course of a careful and full review of the relevant authorities. The judgment of Davidson J as to the standard of proof in a civil proceeding was expressly accepted by Latham CJ and Dixon J (as he then was) in that case on appeal to this court: Hocking v Bell (1945) 71 CLR 430 at pp 464500. Although the course taken by the other justices participating in that appeal did not call for any pronouncement by them on the point, there is nothing in any of the reasons of those justices to suggest disapproval of the judgment of Davidson J in presently relevant respects. Dixon J (as he then was) expressed his clear
Image of page 12
Image of page 13

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture