Sat in front of the presiding officer compiling notes

This preview shows page 5 - 7 out of 17 pages.

sat in front of the presiding officer, compiling notes of the debates, not missing a single  day or a single major speech. He later remarked that his self-confinement in the hall,  which was often oppressively hot in the Philadelphia summer, almost killed him. The sessions of the convention were held in secret--no reporters or visitors were  permitted. Although many of the naturally loquacious members were prodded in the  pubs and on the streets, most remained surprisingly discreet. To those suspicious of the convention, the curtain of secrecy only served to confirm their anxieties. Luther Martin of Maryland later charged that the conspiracy in Philadelphia needed a quiet breeding  ground. Thomas Jefferson wrote John Adams from Paris, "I am sorry they began their  deliberations by so abominable a precedent as that of tying up the tongues of their  members." 5
The Virginia Plan On Tuesday morning, May 29, Edmund Randolph, the tall, 34-year- old governor of  Virginia, opened the debate with a long speech decrying the evils that had befallen the  country under the Articles of Confederation and stressing the need for creating a strong  national government. Randolph then outlined a broad plan that he and his Virginia  compatriots had, through long sessions at the Indian Queen tavern, put together in the  days preceding the convention. James Madison had such a plan on his mind for years.  The proposed government had three branches--legislative, executive, and judicial--each branch structured to check the other. Highly centralized, the government would have  veto power over laws enacted by state legislatures. The plan, Randolph confessed,  "meant a strong  consolidated  union in which the idea of states should be nearly  annihilated." This was, indeed, the rat so offensive to Patrick Henry. The introduction of the so-called Virginia Plan at the beginning of the convention was a  tactical coup. The Virginians had forced the debate into their own frame of reference  and in their own terms. For 10 days the members of the convention discussed the sweeping and, to many  delegates, startling Virginia resolutions. The critical issue, described succinctly by  Gouverneur Morris on May 30, was the distinction between a federation and a national  government, the "former being a mere compact resting on the good faith of the parties;  the latter having a compleat and  compulsive  operation." Morris favored the latter, a  "supreme power" capable of exercising necessary authority not merely a shadow  government, fragmented and hopelessly ineffective.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture