An echocardiogram would be needed to definitively diagnose valvular aortic

An echocardiogram would be needed to definitively

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An echocardiogram would be needed to definitively diagnose valvular aortic stenosis. This would not only provide a diagnosis but aid the clinician in assessing the degree of hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall. According to Huether, & McCance, (2012) the physiological consequence of severe aortic stenosis is hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall, which then may lead to increased end-diastolic pressure, which in turn causes hypertension in the pulmonary arteries and veins. Treatment The treatment for valvular aortic stenosis is determined by the severity of symptoms. If discovered early the goal of treatment is often continued observation and monitoring of cardiac function. Baloon angioplasty is not favored in children with aortic stenosis as it often results in aortic regurgitation and these patients almost always require needing surgical valuotomies (Huether, & McCance, 2012). The ROSS procedure is the treatment of choice in many children. This involves replacing the stenosis aortic valve with the pulmonary valve and placing a homograft in the place of the pulmonary valve (Huether, & McCance, 2012). The benefit of the
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ROSS procedure is there is no need for anticoagulation and it defers mechanical valve replacement as long as possible (Huether, & McCance, 2012).
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  • Spring '15
  • stenosis, mitral valve, Huether, valvular aortic stenosis

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