Electrical cardioversion convert a fib to normal

This preview shows page 11 - 13 out of 23 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 10 / Exercise 1
Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems
Sherwood
Expert Verified
Electrical Cardioversion – convert A-fib to normal sinus rhythm a) Preop: i. If A-fib is longer than 48 hrs – administer anticoag therapy (Warfarin) for 3-4 weeks Procedure can cause clots to dislodge ( risk for stroke) ii. Transesophageal Echocardiogram – to rule out clots in the atria If no clots found – anticoag therapy is not required 3) If drugs or cardioversion are ineffective: a) Long-term anticoag therapy is needed i. Monitor Warfarin levels for therapeutic level. ii. Alternative to warfarin in pts w/ nonvalvular A-fib dabigatran (Pradaxa), apixaban (Eliquis), rivaroxaban (Xarelto) Does not require frequent lab testing b) Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation c) Maze procedure – surgical intervention that stops atrial fibrillation by interrupting ectopic electrical signals responsible for dysrhythmia. i. Incisions are made in both atria and cryoablation (cold therapy) is used to stop formation and conduction of signals restores normal sinus rhythm II. Week 3 – COPD, Asthma A. Asthma - chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways intermittent and reversible airflow obstruction of the bronchioles 1. R/F – Genetics, allergen inhalation or exposure (cockroaches, furry animals, fungi, molds), air pollutants, inflammation and infection, drugs, occupational exposure, food additives, GERD, exercise, cold and dry air a. Occupational Lung Disease – Client arrives at work well but experience gradual decline d/t exposure, months-years of exposure b. Drugs can trigger – Beta-adrenergic (metoprolol (Toprol), timolol), ACE Inhibitors (Lisinopril (Prinivil) 2. S/S – chest tightness, dyspnea, anxiety and/or stress, coughing, wheezing, mucus production, use of accessory muscles, prolonged exhalation, poor oxygen saturation, barrel chest or chest diameter 3. Diagnostics – ABGs, Pulmonary Function tests, Chest X-ray, Peak Flow Monitoring, CnS, allergy testing a. ABGs 1) Hypoxemia - PaO2 less than 80 mmHg
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 10 / Exercise 1
Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems
Sherwood
Expert Verified
2) Hypocarbia - PaCO2 less than 35 mmHg 3) Hypercarbia - PaCO2 greater than 45 mmHg) b. Obtain detailed history and physical exam 4. Management: a. Promote smoking cessation. b. Use protective equipment and ensure proper ventilation while working in environments that contain carcinogens or particles in the air. c. Encourage influenza and pneumonia vaccinations d. Avoid and identify triggers – air pollutants, environmental factors, strong odors, seasonal allergens, stress, emotional distress, medications, chemicals, sinusitis, respiratory infection e. Encourage regular exercise f. Use hot water to eliminate dust mites in bed linens g. Manage asthma symptoms and attacks w/ culturally sensitive and patient-tailored care and meds h. Take a detailed health history and identify precipitating factors that has helped to alleviate attacks before. i. Avoid Aspirin and NSAIDS if they are known to precipitate an attack.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture